Clouds over Lake Huron.

One from the archives taken in Ontario, Canada on the Lake Huron shoreline at the bottom of High Street in Southampton. A film shot from the early 2000s.

Chantry Island and it’s lighthouse are on the horizon at the left side of the frame. There’s no EXIF data the original being on film but given the apparent angle of view I’d guess it was taken with my 17mm Tamron lens on an Olympus OM body.

Storm clouds over Chantry Island and Lake Huron.

Bohemian Waxwing at -30°C.

Throwback Thursday is a follow-up of sorts to yesterdays Wordless Wednesday post. Here’s a Bohemian Waxwing (Bombycilla garrulus) at -30°C.

Both birds were photographed in Saskatchewan, Canada in the winter. I’m always impressed by the way small birds survive winter temperatures.

Nowadays some digital cameras make a big deal about a freezeproof rating of -10°C. I find that rather humourous having shot film at -40°C and digital at -20°C.

I found a small flock of Bohemian Waxwings feeding along a fence line one morning. I briefly considered putting up a portable hide (blind) until I thought about how hard it would be to peg down given how frozen the field would be. In the end I followed them along the fence line for a while before leaving them to finish stripping the berries.

A Bohemian Waxwing at -30°C.

 

An impression of trees, part three.

After experimenting with deliberate camera movement during exposure earlier in the year I had another experiment on a Sunday morning walk.

This experiment was different in a couple of ways. Firstly, the leaves are now off the trees so there is less colour but the trees are more graphical shapes with the bare branches.

Secondly, for my earlier experiments I had been using short telephoto lenses. For this shot I went in the opposite direction and used my fisheye lens. A fisheye lens has an ultra wide angle of view with strong visual distortion towards the edges of the photos.

I find it interesting that the tops of the trees are curved inwards due to the distortion of the fisheye lens but that the branches streak outwards due to the camera movement. It was an exposure of 1/3 of a second while panning the camera vertically.

An impression of trees with a fisheye lens.

Bare branches.

Monochrome Monday travels back a day to a walk on Sunday morning. With a weekend of thick cloud and poor light I decided to shoot with the intention of converting certain shots to monochrome.

I had a telephoto lens on the camera when I set out. At the turn around point of the walk I swapped the telephoto for my fisheye lens. I kept checking overhead looking for some interesting patterns in the bare branches. I centred myself in this group of trees and because the camera is looking straight up there’s not a lot of fisheye distortion.

Autumn trees and branches.

Fisheye Birch tree trunk.

This week’s Cosmic Photo Challenge is From An Unusual Angle.

I went for a walk on Sunday morning of week 47 and dropped my fisheye lens in a coat pocket. I had the idea of using the fisheye lens to try to find a photo for the challenge. When I reached the turn around point of my walk I swapped from the telephoto I had on the camera to the fisheye lens.

This is a fisheye look at the trunk of a Paper Birch tree. To fill the frame I ended up so close to the trunk I nearly fell over the roots at the base of the trunk and then nearly hit the trunk with the lens.

A Paper Birch trunk with a fisheye lens.

Week 47. Snow covered shoreline at dawn.

Saturday morning of week 47 saw me down at Colpoy’s Bay for the sunrise. I wasn’t planning on being down there as the weather forecast was for rain starting before sunrise. I checked the local weather when the alarm went off which was reporting mostly cloudy but dry so I decided to head out.

I get the current weather conditions from the nearest Environment Canada Weather Station which is at Wiarton Airport. The airport is across Colpoy’s Bay on top of the Niagara Escarpment. In this shot the airport is to the left of the right hand tree.

The band of clear sky over the Niagara Escarpment didn’t last long before it was full cloud cover. The dark specks on the foreground snow are seeds from one of the trees on the shoreline.

Snow covered shoreline at dawn.