Male Common Blackbird.

Continuing a bit of a recent Throwback Thursday theme¬†of birds eating windfall apples here’s a male Common Blackbird (Turdus merula) photographed in Cheshire, England.

The Common Blackbird, sometimes known as the Eurasian Blackbird or simply the Blackbird in the U.K. is a year round resident in Britain and is a member of the Thrush family. The male is black with an orange bill and eye ring.

Male Eurasian Blackbird.

Section of a rainbow.

Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge this week is Rainbow Colors.

The Challenge specifies that the photo must have four colors. Having a selection to pick from I decided to take the challenge literally and use a photo of a rainbow.

This is a section of a rainbow taken with a long telephoto while I sat in a bird hide (blind) photographing a winter gull roost.

Rainbow colors.

Living sky.

This current Weekly Prompt Photo Challenge is Sky.

A subject that I have rather a lot of options available for. Then I thought about living in Saskatchewan, Canada in the late 1990s. Saskatchewan proclaims itself the “Land of Living Skies” with the slogan on the provincial license plates.

That got me thinking about some of my shots from my time in Saskatchewan and some of the flocks of Snow Geese and Sandhill Cranes. This is a flock of Sandhill Cranes flying to roost at sunset in the autumn. The photo was taken north of Little Quill Lake, part of a wetland complex in Saskatchewan.

Living sky.

Some winter detail.

Monochrome Monday goes back a few weeks to a walk in the new year.

I spotted this small section of dry stone wall surrounded by thawing snow. The Ivy leaves added a splash of colour although I shot the image with the plan to try a monochrome conversion. I rather like the way the veins of the Ivy leaves appear in this conversion.

Dry stone wall with Ivy leaves and snow.

Sharp.

This week’s Cosmic Photo Challenge is The Sharpest Image.

I was considering a follow-up to last week’s challenge which was It’s A Blur by using a blurred image that had an element or elements of sharpness.

Then I thought of this shot, possibly because over the last month I have had an intravenous line in the back of each hand at different times and have had so much blood taken it’s become a joke between the lab technician and myself.

This photo of a syringe is from a studio shoot in the 1980s. One of the shots was used on a magazine cover. I used coloured gels over the flash heads to add some colour to the syringe and needle.

A sharp syringe.