Frosted Squirrel.

One from the archives, taken in Saskatchewan, Canada in the late 1990s. And just in case you’re wondering, frosted squirrel is not a recipe.

This Eastern Gray Squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis) was photographed one winter morning at around –30°C. The squirrel has frost on the tips of some of the hairs on its tail despite the sun and the photo being taken in the late morning if I recall correctly.

Eastern Gray Squirrel with frost on its tail.

Male Common Redpoll in winter.

One from the archives, taken in Saskatchewan in the late 1990s. I found a small flock of Common Redpolls (Acanthis flammea) feeding on windblown seeds caught in a snow bank.

Due to the temperature and wind I set up a portable hide (blind). This allowed me to get close to the birds without disturbing them while keeping slightly warmer as I was out of the wind. Sitting in the hide also put me closer to eye level with the birds on the snow bank.

The red on the breast makes this individual a male. The current scientific classification of the various Redpoll species is under debate by the various taxonomic authorities. My reasoning is that if they can’t agree I’m sticking with this being a male Common Redpoll.

Common Redpoll on snow.

 

The South Bank one Sunday morning.

One from the archives taken early one Sunday morning on the South Bank of the River Thames in London, England in the early 1980s.

I was living and working in north London at the time, running a photo department during the week and shooting a variety of personal work at the weekends. Early one Sunday morning I headed down to Westminster with my tripod and camera bag.

There was a light mist over the River Thames which added to my decision to shoot black and white. Big Ben and the Houses of Parliament were partially obscured by the mist, adding to the atmosphere.

I used my Olympus OM1 loaded with Ilford FP4 which was my regular black and white film.

Early morning on the South Bank.

Minimalist wood piles.

A shot from a couple of weeks ago in the middle of December when I had gone down to the Colpoy’s Bay shoreline for the sunrise. The sunrise was so spectacular that I put my telephoto zoom on the camera and started isolating interesting details on the shoreline.

I edited this shot of old wood piles sticking out of the bay at the time but it didn’t work for me. I tried re-editing it a couple of days later but it still didn’t work for me.

Yesterday I re-edited it as a monochrome image and it works for me this way. Now I find myself wondering if subconsciously I had taken the shots as monochrome. It’s strange, when there was still a demand for monochrome images from newspapers and magazines I had no problem “seeing” an image in black and white. But since I stopped shooting black and white I seem to have lost the ability to see monochrome images the way I used to.

Wood piles in monochrome.

Hoarfrost on Cotoneaster.

One from the archives taken in Cheshire, England in the mid 1990s. I think this is Cotoneaster horizontalis, commonly grown in gardens and popular with some species of birds in the winter due to the berries. It is native to western China but is well established in the U.K. where some consider it my be becoming invasive.

I have two copies of the original slide. The first, done several years ago has a much warmer colour than this version edited last winter. I normally prefer a warmer colour balance to a shot but for this post went with the cooler colour balance.

Hoarfrost on Cotoneaster berries.

Wintering Fieldfare.

A follow-up of sorts to a recent Throwback Thursday post of a Redwing eating a Holly berry.

The Fieldfare (Turdus pilaris) is another member of the Thrush family and related to the Redwing. As with the Redwing they arrive in Britain in the autumn to spend the winter having bred in northern Europe and Asia.

Taken in Cheshire, England in the 1980s. This bird had taken up residence in an orchard, feeding on windfall apples in the snow.

Wintering Fieldfare in an orchard.