Feeding Whooper Swan.

One from the archives taken in Lancashire, England in the mid 1990s.

I was at the Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust Martin Mere reserve. There was a few Whooper Swans close to one of the hides in the morning. With the nice light on the birds I spent some time shooting as wide a variety of images as possible.

I like the way the light is catching the drops of water on the birds head and neck as it feeds.

Portrait of a feeding Whooper Swan.

 

Being watched at sunset.

One from the archives taken in Lancashire, England in the 1990s. I spent most of the day at Martin Mere Wetland Centre, a Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust nature reserve. There’s a selection of wooden hides (blinds) overlooking various areas of the reserve.

I made sure that I was in the most suitable hide as the sun was setting with the intention of shooting silhouettes of the wildfowl on the water. This male Common Pochard appears to be staring at the lens although I suspect that it is a coincidence as the birds generally ignored the hides. I like the way the last light is catching the grey portion of the birds bill.

Being watched at sunset.

Lighthouse at sunset.

One from the archives taken in the early 2000s when I was living a few blocks from the Lake Huron shoreline in Southampton, Ontario.

Taken with a telephoto lens to make the lighthouse large in the frame. As I was down at the shoreline regularly I could time the camera exposure to the flash of the light in the lighthouse. If I recall correctly the light flashed every six seconds. So after it flashed I would count five seconds and then release the shutter before counting six.

Lighthouse at sunset.

Amanita muscaria.

A second Fly Agaric post, Amanita muscaria is the scientific name for the mushroom.

Although classified as poisonous it hasn’t stopped slugs or snails eating part of the cap of the one on the right. You can just see the edge of eaten section slightly right of centre of the top of the cap.

At the same time, the reason it is called Fly Agaric in English is because in the past the mushroom was powdered into milk to kill flies in parts of Europe. Bug Agaric is an old alternative name for the mushroom for the same reason.

Amanita muscaria.

Fly Agaric.

One from the archives taken in Cheshire in the 1990s. Fly Agaric are the classic Toadstool beloved by illustrators of children’s stories.

But they’re far more interesting than that. With the red cap and white spots some people assume it’s highly poisonous. It is poisonous but human deaths from ingestion are extremely rare.

It contains psychoactive substances and some cultures have used it for its hallucinogenic properties. The mushroom was used as an intoxicant and entheogen by the indigenous peoples of Siberia.

I picked this shot because I like the way the Bracken fronds have wiped the white spots off a section of the cap. The white spots are the remains of a white veil that enclose the mushrooms when they emerge from the soil.

Fly Agaric and Bracken.

Green in the autumn, part two.

Technically this should have been part one as it was taken a week or so before my recent green in the autumn post.

I was on a local back road looking for autumn colour one evening recently. I found the autumn colour disappointing and the sunset wasn’t developing but I liked the way the low sun was backlighting these leaves.

The shot was taken in a memorial forest. An area that is being replanted with native trees, each in memory of a loved one. There are three in the area.

Backlit leaves in evening light.