Green baize and a soap bubble.

Today being Saint Patrick’s Day got me thinking about the colour green and things associated with the colour.

Baize is a coarse woollen cloth traditionally dyed green and used on snooker and billiards tables to cover the slate and cushions. The photo below dates back to the late 1970s. The green baize is actually a tablecloth on a photo studio table. The snooker cue was attached to a tripod and a friend is blowing bubbles. You can see his reflection in the soap bubble. I am bursting any soap bubbles that land in the wrong place or are the wrong size. I don’t remember how long it took us to get the shot.

Soap bubble snooker ball

What’s in a name?

Most people in Britain call them a Wren, some call them a Jenny Wren. As a bird photographer I captioned the photo below as a Winter Wren when it was taken in the 1990s. The photo was taken in Cheshire, England and at the time the bird was classified as the same species as the Winter Wren found in North America.

However, since researchers started analysing the DNA of species it has been reclassified. In Europe and Asia the bird is now called the Eurasian Wren. The North American Winter Wren has been split into two species, the Winter Wren that can be found in eastern North America and the Pacific Wren found along the Pacific coast of North America. As a result, the North American species also have new scientific names.

So to the photo, a Winter, sorry Eurasian Wren singing to proclaim it’s territory in the spring. Ah, spring, it’s -11°C with a wind chill of -17 as I type this.

Eurasian Wren (Troglodytes troglodytes), Hurleston Reservoir, Cheshire, England

Gray on gray.

With some black and some white. Actually the birds bill is red although you can’t tell from this photo. A winter plumage Black-headed Gull (Chroicocephalus ridibundus) on water in a thick fog taken on Hurleston Reservoir, Cheshire, England.

One from my film archives from the 1990s. Kodachrome probably although you wouldn’t know it from this shot. I do remember that I spent a lot of time racking the focus backwards and forwards as it was very difficult to focus on the bird through the fog.

Black-headed Gull in fog, Hurleston Reservoir, Cheshire, England