Hoarfrost on Cotoneaster.

One from the archives taken in Cheshire, England in the mid 1990s. I think this is Cotoneaster horizontalis, commonly grown in gardens and popular with some species of birds in the winter due to the berries. It is native to western China but is well established in the U.K. where some consider it my be becoming invasive.

I have two copies of the original slide. The first, done several years ago has a much warmer colour than this version edited last winter. I normally prefer a warmer colour balance to a shot but for this post went with the cooler colour balance.

Hoarfrost on Cotoneaster berries.

Wintering Fieldfare.

A follow-up of sorts to a recent Throwback Thursday post of a Redwing eating a Holly berry.

The Fieldfare (Turdus pilaris) is another member of the Thrush family and related to the Redwing. As with the Redwing they arrive in Britain in the autumn to spend the winter having bred in northern Europe and Asia.

Taken in Cheshire, England in the 1980s. This bird had taken up residence in an orchard, feeding on windfall apples in the snow.

Wintering Fieldfare in an orchard.

Clouds over Lake Huron.

One from the archives taken in Ontario, Canada on the Lake Huron shoreline at the bottom of High Street in Southampton. A film shot from the early 2000s.

Chantry Island and it’s lighthouse are on the horizon at the left side of the frame. There’s no EXIF data the original being on film but given the apparent angle of view I’d guess it was taken with my 17mm Tamron lens on an Olympus OM body.

Storm clouds over Chantry Island and Lake Huron.

An autumn Pine Siskin.

One from the archives, taken in Saskatchewan, Canada in the 1990s. The Pine Siskin (Spinus pinus) looks fluffed up against the cold but it will get a lot colder in the winter.

Pine Siskins can survive very low temperatures. Their metabolic rate is 40% higher than typical for songbirds of their size. In extreme cold they can increase their metabolic rate up to five times normal.

This is my favourite Pine Siskin shot from Saskatchewan although I can’t explain why. The bird isn’t doing anything and is partially obscured by a branch. Maybe it’s the colour combination of the bird and the autumn leaves.

An autumn Pine Siskin.

Old wall box.

One from the archives taken in Cheshire in the 1980s. A wall box is a type of post box set into a wall.

This box was set into a sandstone wall on Bickerton Hill, Cheshire, England. Bickerton Hill is a low, red sandstone hill close to the southern end of a long-distance footpath known as The Sandstone Trail. The area was quarried in the past so the wall is probably built of locally sourced sandstone.

I did a selective colour treatment to leave the post box red with the rest of the image in monochrome.

Sometime after the photo was taken the post box was stolen. Removed from the wall in the dead of night I presume. Apparently there are people who collect old post boxes and obviously some aren’t concerned about obtaining them legally.

Selective colour treatment of an old post box.