Wave on shoreline at sunrise.

I spent part of the summer of 1985 in Ontario, Canada shooting stock for a couple of photo libraries. So Throwback Thursday takes me back 33 years. In a strange coincidence, having moved around Britain and Canada in the intervening years I currently live about 20 minutes from where the photo was taken.

A shot of a wave breaking on the shoreline of Georgian Bay at sunrise using a slow shutter speed to get some movement in the water.

Wave on stones.

Dawn light on Lake Huron.

It’s Throwback Thursday and this week is a follow-up of sorts to last week.

Last week I posted one of the last images I shot on film. This week I’m posting an early digital image taken soon after the film image from last week.

I had been shooting film along side digital for about a while but went totally digital 11 years ago this month. The photo below is the eleventh shot taken with the Olympus E-410 I had just purchased.

After posting the photo on a photo forum I was approached by a camera magazine who wanted to use it. When I asked about their usage rates I was informed that they don’t pay for photos. Hard to comprehend that a magazine aimed at photographers expected them to give their work away. Needless to say, they didn’t get to use the photo.

So to the photo. It shows the Range Light at the mouth of the Saugeen River on the Lake Huron shoreline at Southampton, Ontario about 15 minutes before sunrise.

Range light at dawn.

More Canada Day fireworks.

As this is the first Throwback Thursday after Canada Day I thought this selection was rather appropriate.

Not as old a photo as some of my Throwback Thursday posts but there is a reason why I picked this shot. Taken 11 years ago, it was one of the last images I shot on film. I suspect it was on the last roll of film I exposed.

Taken on the Lake Huron shoreline, it’s the Canada Day firework display in Southampton, Ontario. I set up some distance down the lakeshore and photographed the fireworks with a long telephoto lens. The photo also show the Range Light at the mouth of the Saugeen River. The spit on the shoreline that the fireworks are being set off from in now under water as the level has risen since the photo was taken.

Canada Day fireworks, Southampton.

Wet Paint.

Throwback Thursday brings another photo with a variety of throwbacks.

The subject is a British post box photographed in Cheshire, England in the mid 1980s. I used to look out for interesting post boxes and classic red British telephone boxes to photograph. In those days editors were often looking for images of red post and telephone boxes so it was useful to have some interesting ones on file.

It was the casual, chalked warning of Wet Paint that first caught my eye. Nowadays there may be Caution Tape surrounding it to keep people away from the wet paint. The red paint on the utility pole amused me.

Also notable is the GR cast into the door. That means that the post box is from the reign of King George V which dates it from 1910 to 1936. Which means it was at least 50 years old when I took the photo.

Wet Paint on a post box.

A species of Wren.

I do know what species of Wren this is but as it’s Throwback Thursday it gives me an opportunity to illustrate a problem captioning certain photos.

The photo was taken in Cheshire, England in the 1980s. In those days most British field guides gave the common English name as Wren. A few would call it a Winter Wren as it was classified as the same species as the North American Winter Wren.

However, over the past couple of decades scientists have been DNA testing lots of species which has resulted in quite a few being reclassified. What was a Wren or Winter Wren in Britain is now a separate species, the Eurasian Wren. The North American Winter Wren has been split into two species. It’s still the Winter Wren in central and eastern North America but the birds down the west coast are now called the Pacific Wren.

To make matters even more complicated the splitting of the various species means new scientific names for some. As my standard photo caption includes both the common English name and the scientific name it means that quite a high percentage of the birds I have on film now have inaccurate captions written on the slide mounts.

So to the photo. It shows an adult Eurasian Wren emerging from a nestbox. An unusual nest site for the species which normally prefers to build a nest hidden in vegetation.

Jenny Wren is a common English name.

Scrambling or Moto X?

It’s Throwback Thursday and as the photo was taken in the late 1970s is was called Scrambling, not Moto X in those days.

It’s also a throwback in other ways. Note the protective gear the rider is wearing, boots, gloves, helmet, goggles and face guard. Compare that to all the body armour worn by Moto X competitors these days.

Another throwback is the camera technology. Film of course but in those days manual focus and manual exposure. A rare colour image as I shot mostly black and white for the local newspaper.

Moto X

A pair of American Avocets.

A pair of American Avocets feeding on a slough in Saskatchewan. By the curve of the bills it’s a male in front and a female behind.

A film shot from Saskatchewan in the mid 1990s. Taken from a vehicle window using a bean bag on the window frame to support the lens. A form of Throwback Thursday.

A pair of American Avocets.