Portrait of a Mourning Dove.

Just a portrait of a Mourning Dove but it shows the patch of iridescent feathers on the neck. They’re hardly noticeable most of the time so it was nice to get a shot showing them.

Taken in dappled sunlight last week. I was considering it for my week 29 photo but went with a different bird image.

Mourning Dove portrait.

Raindrop in the rain.

Monochrome Monday goes all the way back to yesterday. I had set up a camera in the yard to photograph the birds and it started raining soon after I set up. The bird’s weren’t cooperating so I started shooting raindrops.

I spotted the lone raindrop on the end of a branch with rain falling around it and took a variety of shots with the plan of a monochrome conversion.

A solitary raindrop.

‘Don’t move!’

‘There’s a bug on your Hi Viz.’

This week’s Cosmic Photo Challenge is Street Photography.

The shot isn’t really street photography as it was taken at an airport. We visited the Air and Auto Extravaganza at Wiarton Airport on the South Bruce Peninsula a few weeks ago. The thing that struck me was the number of people wearing Hi Viz vests. At times it seemed they out numbered the public at the event. So I was watching out for photo opportunities featuring people in Hi Viz.

This rather amused me but I don’t know if it was the reaction to the bug on the vest or me wondering if it was a colour blind bug.

Naughty bug, get off there.

Week 29. A bird in the rain.

Sunday of week 29 started off dry until I set the camera up in the yard. Within 10 minutes it was spotting with rain and 15 minutes after that it was raining. It’s still raining as I write this post, I don’t think it’s stopped since it started.

We really needed the rain, it’s been so dry around here this summer the leaves are coming off the trees.

To the photo, it’s a young male Rose-breasted Grosbeak photographed on the South Bruce Peninsula, Ontario on a wet Sunday afternoon.

Rose-breasted Grosbeak in the rain.

Virginia Spiderwort flower.

A Virginia Spiderwort flower after rain. Wort used in the names of plants and herbs can mean that the species was traditionally used medicinally or as food.

The plant is native to eastern North America. It is commonly grown in gardens and this flower was photographed in Cheshire, England.

Raindrops on a Virginia Spiderwort flower.

Fog on the Niagara Escarpment.

A shot from last weekend that I almost overlooked. I was down at Colpoy’s Bay for the sunrise. There was some mist over the water but I noticed that there was thicker fog on the Niagara Escarpment across the bay. Despite being taken around sunrise it’s an almost monochromatic shot. This is as it came out of the camera.

The Niagara Escarpment is very long, it loops through Ontario, Canada after starting and ending in the U.S. A lot of people will be familiar with it where the Niagara River flows over it at Niagara Falls but it also forms the spine of the Bruce Peninsula. I was standing at the base of it when I took the photo as it circles Colpoy’s Bay.

The Niagara Escarpment across Colpoy's Bay.

Silver-studded Blue Butterflies.

A pair of Silver-studded Blue Butterflies mating on a grass seed head. The species gets its name from the pale blue, reflective spots on the underside of the wings. The spots (or studs) can be seen on the female in this shot which is the lower butterfly.

Photographed on Prees Heath, Shropshire, England in the mid 1990s. The butterflies on Prees Heath are isolated, the nearest other colony being some distance away in North Wales. In fact this population is the only one found in central and northern England. The species is not found in Scotland.

Silver-studded Blue Butterflies mating.