The eleventh young Eurasian Blue Tit.

The eleventh youngster in the nestbox wasn’t ready to leave. All its siblings have left and are being fed and taught to survive by the adults. At times I could hear one of the adults calling to encourage the youngster out of the nestbox but it wasn’t leaving. Despite having ten young to look after the adults would still bring in a caterpillar occasionally for the one left behind.

I checked that the youngster was still in the nestbox several times during the day and it was still there that night. I got up the following morning and the nestbox was empty. The bird must have left the nestbox as soon as there was some light in the sky.

Left alone.

It would occasionally get up at the entrance hole but wouldn’t leave the nestbox.

The last young left in the nestbox.

The young are leaving the nest.

It’s time for the young to leave the nestbox. I watched and photographed as the young left one by one. Ten of the eleven young left over the space of about 90 minutes. The eleventh youngster will be the subject of the next post in this story.

The fourth youngster leaves the nestbox.

Leaving the nestbox.

The ninth youngster leaves.

Number nine leaves the nestbox.

Close to leaving.

The young are getting close to leaving the nest. They’ve been getting up to the nestbox entrance hole and looking outside. At this point they will leave any day now and as they normally leave the nestbox as soon as there’s enough daylight for them to see I’ve got my alarm clock set to be at the nestbox half an hour before sunrise.

Looking out of the nestbox.

They’re also exercising their wings in preparation for flying the nest. This doesn’t go down well with their brothers and sisters at times.

Exercising its wings.

Some birds from week 21.

First, a Pine Siskin. Normally an occasional winter species for us but we had large numbers last winter and we’ve still got a dozen or so around this spring. They’re an irruptive species meaning numbers vary from year to year as the birds follow food sources.

A spring Pine Siskin.

Next, a Turkey Vulture soars overhead while I waited for an uncooperative Baltimore Oriole.

Looking for something to eat.

Finally a female Common Grackle searching for a meal in the yard. An often overlooked species, a lot of people regard them as a nuisance around their bird feeders. I rather like them although I don’t have a lot of shots of the species.

A spring Common Grackle.