Hiding in the Pondweed.

A Common Frog amongst Pondweed in a garden pond.

Throwback Thursday travels back to Cheshire, England in the late 1980s. The pond was constructed for wildlife and within a year Common Frogs were spawning in it and there was a variety of insects living on or in the water. Some of the Common Frogs got so used to people they would stay on the surface of the pond rather than diving under the water.

Hiding in the Pondweed.

Wiarton Village Fair fireworks.

It was the Wiarton Village Fair over the weekend of week 31. So on the Sunday evening I went down to the dock at Colpoy’s Bay for the Village Fair fireworks.

The fireworks are launched from the public dock in the town of Wiarton. According to Google maps the two docks are 2.6 miles apart across Colpoy’s Bay.

For these fireworks I used a telephoto lens I purchased in the very early 1980s. I say very early because I remember using it at the Le Mans 24 hour motorcycle endurance race in April 1982. Between the camera and lens was a 1.4x teleconverter that I wasn’t sure would even fit on the back of the lens until I tried it shortly before the fireworks started.

Fireworks at the Wiarton Village Fair.

Week 31. Backlit Sandhill Cranes.

Sunday morning of week 31 saw me returning from the sunrise at Colpoy’s Bay when I spotted two Sandhill Cranes (Antigone canadensis) in a hay field.

The sun was still low in the sky and behind the birds providing some interesting lighting. There was still round bales in the field so I spent some time waiting for one or the other to appear from behind a bale. At on point the two birds started calling to each other but one of the birds was mostly hidden behind a bale at the time.

Sandhill Cranes at sunrise.

A feather for lunch.

This week’s Cosmic Photo Challenge is The Food of Love.

I gave this some thought and then remembered this photo. It shows a fairly common piece of behavior for various species of Grebes that researchers and scientists have yet to fully explain.

The photo shows an adult Great Crested Grebe feeding one of its breast feathers to two of its young. One theory suggests this behavior is an aid to digesting their food by protecting their stomach from sharp fish bones. Another theory is that the feathers help the birds form pellets of undigested fish bones allowing them to regurgitate the pellets.

Adult Great Crested Grebe with young.