Categories
Throwback Thursday

St Mary’s Church, Acton near Nantwich

Throwback Thursday travels back to Cheshire, England in the mid 1980s.

First I should apologise to anyone who follows my Facebook page as I posted this photo on there recently. The reason for using this photo as a Throwback Thursday post is because there’s an example of 17th century vandalism in the photo.

This is St Mary’s Church in Acton near Nantwich, Cheshire. The church is historically significant, the tower is the oldest in Cheshire and there are carved stones internally that date back to Norman times.

But it’s the tall, four sided sundial on the right side of the photo that I want to talk about. It started life as a medieval cross until someone in the late 17th century decided to turn it into a sundial. Can you imagine the outcry if someone suggested such a thing these days.

Throwback Thursday: 7th May 2020

 

Categories
Cee's B & W Photo Challenge

Lychgates

Alternative spellings are lichgate, lycugate, lyke-gate or as two words lych gate.

This is my contribution to Cee’s Black and White Photo Challenge: Fences and Gates.

The word lych dates back to Old English or Saxon and means corpse. Lychgates are covered gateways into an English churchyard.

 

Cee's Black and White Photo Challenge: Fences and Gates

The lychgate into the churchyard of St Mary’s Church, Acton, Cheshire, England. A traditional style with an extensive roof.

 

Cee's Black and White Photo Challenge: Fences and Gates

The lychgate into the churchyard of the Church of St Editha, Church Eaton, Staffordshire, England. A more modern representation of a lychgate. There are several interesting things in the photo, at the left edge of the frame in an old fashioned water pump. Between the water pump and the lychgate is a very worn sandstone step. The step has had so much use that the slab of sandstone has been flipped over to use the other side as the step. Finally, according to my caption on the slide mount the church originally had a tower with the spire added at a later date.

 

Categories
One Word Sunday

Cross.

Actually I count at least four crosses. But they’re not really the point of this post.

The tall sundial in the foreground is what remains of a medieval cross. It was turned into a sundial in the late 17th century.

An act of vandalism that wouldn’t be considered these days. Destroying something medieval to make a sundial is the sort of thing that makes me Cross.

This is my contribution to One Word Sunday: Cross.

One Word Sunday: Cross.

Categories
Tuesday Photo Challenge

St Mary’s Church, Acton, Cheshire

The new Tuesday Photo Challenge is Worship.

This is St Mary’s Church, Acton, Cheshire. Built in the 12th century the tower collapsed in a storm in March 1757 and was rebuilt after the storm but shortened by over 20 feet.

Built with local red sandstone I like the colour combination of the deep blue sky, weathered red sandstone and green grass.

St Mary's Church south side.

Categories
Cosmic Photo Challenge

Structural red sandstone.

This week’s Cosmic Photo Challenge is Sublimely Structural. It was rather well timed as I had been planning on using this photo in a post.

This is St Mary’s Church, Acton, Cheshire, England built of, presumably local, red sandstone. I say presumably local because there’s a red sandstone ridge sticking out of the Cheshire plain a few miles to the west of Acton. Parts of the Church are medieval although there are Norman era carved stones in the south aisle. The tower was built around 1180 but its top collapsed in a storm in March 1757 and was rebuilt 20 feet lower than the original tower.

The tall monument in the foreground is now a sundial but was originally a medieval cross before being converted into a sundial in the late 17th century.

Red sandstone Church in Acton,