Eat, bath, preen.

A Marbled Godwit on a section of Little Quill Lake shoreline. Taken one spring in the late 1990s in Saskatchewan.

I remember spending some time with the bird but had forgotten how many photos I had taken until going through my slide archives and digitizing some a few years ago.

The bird feeding.

Feeding Marbled Godwit.

After feeding the bird decided that it was bath time.

A bathing Marbled Godwit.

After bathing the Godwit had a long preen.

Preening Marbled Godwit.

Week 18. Two different birds.

I had a few photos under consideration for week 18 of my 52 week photo project. I spent some time one morning out in the yard photographing some of the birds. A mix of winter visitors still with us and some recently arrived summer visitors. All while being swarmed by Black Flies that are now out. I only got one Black Fly bite which is good as I am allergic to them.

First, a recently arrived summer species, a young male Rose-breasted Grosbeak. I say young male because it’s still showing traces of its juvenile plumage.

A young male Rose-breasted Grosbeak.

Second, a winter species that is still with us. A Pine Siskin, one of a dozen or more still hanging around.

A posing Pine Siskin.

Surrounded by bubbles.

The Daily Post one word prompt is Bubble.

An American White Pelican surrounded by bubbles. The Pelican is one of  a group fishing in a channel where a marsh drains into a section of Last Mountain Lake, Saskatchewan. There is a sluice gate to regulate the water level in the marsh which is causing the bubbles in the water.

The horn on the Pelicans bill shows it is a breeding adult.

Breeding adult American White Pelican

An unlikely afternoon.

The Daily Post Weekly Photo Challenge is Unlikely.

A hot summer afternoon at Last Mountain Lake, Saskatchewan. There’s a couple of dozen American White Pelicans feeding on a channel where a marsh drains into a section of the lake. I set up a tripod in the water at the edge of the channel and I sit in the water behind the camera. After a while the Pelicans are used to me being there and are ignoring me.

I kept hearing a splash to my right but was concentrating on the Pelicans so didn’t pay attention to it. Eventually something caught my eye and I turn my head to find a Red-necked Grebe on the water next to me. The splashing I had been hearing was the bird diving under the water. The angle of the light wasn’t the best and the fact that I was sitting in the water behind the camera meant it was difficult to swing the camera around but I had to get some shots.

Red-necked Grebe watching the photographer

Red-necked Grebe on Last Mountain Lake.

An unlikely morning.

The Daily Post Weekly Photo Challenge is Unlikely.

One spring morning I’m out with the camera at a section of Little Quill Lake, Saskatchewan. The location was several miles from the nearest road and I’ve no idea where the nearest occupied farm was and I had managed to lock my keys in the truck after getting the camera and tripod out. So I decided to photograph a Common Tern fishing and then preening before breaking into the truck.

Eventually I decided it’s time to learn how to break into your own vehicle. How hard could it be, you see actors do it all the time on TV. There was the remains of a long abandoned barbed wire fence nearby so I  walk over and break a piece of wire off. I used the multi-tool I keep in my camera bag to strip the barbs of and get a straight piece of wire. I’m just about to slide the wire down the window to try to pop the lock when a bus loaded with birders drives up followed by a convoy of other vehicles. It was the weekend of the Wadena Shorebirds Festival and they were on an outing to Little Quill Lake. So I’m now being watched by dozens of people as I try to break into my truck. I slide the piece of wire down the window, wriggle it around and the lock pops open. I couldn’t believe how easy it was, I must have looked like a professional car thief to the spectators. A couple of the birders wander over to make sure that I was breaking into my own vehicle.

After a while the bird tour departs and a few minutes later half a dozen Wilson’s Phalaropes fly in and start feeding along the shoreline. I crawl across some sand, well I’ll call it sand although there was rather a lot of duck and goose poop mixed in it, and get into position to photograph the Phalaropes. They completely ignored me, I had females walking almost up to the lens, to close to focus on.

Feeding Phalarope.

One of the female Wilson’s Phalaropes poses for a portrait.

Female Wilson's Phalarope.