Virginia Spiderwort flower.

A Virginia Spiderwort flower after rain. Wort used in the names of plants and herbs can mean that the species was traditionally used medicinally or as food.

The plant is native to eastern North America. It is commonly grown in gardens and this flower was photographed in Cheshire, England.

Raindrops on a Virginia Spiderwort flower.

Yellow Flag in the rain.

Also known as Yellow Iris and Water Flag.

One from the archives, taken in Cheshire in the mid 1980s. I was playing around with a high speed transparency film, Scotchchrome 1000. I picked it for its pronounced grain and pastel colours, at times adding soft focus or diffusion filters.

I was trying to get an editor or publisher interested in the work. No one was interested at the time although some of the photos have proved popular over the years.

Also known as Yellow Iris and Water Flag.

Wet Paint.

Throwback Thursday brings another photo with a variety of throwbacks.

The subject is a British post box photographed in Cheshire, England in the mid 1980s. I used to look out for interesting post boxes and classic red British telephone boxes to photograph. In those days editors were often looking for images of red post and telephone boxes so it was useful to have some interesting ones on file.

It was the casual, chalked warning of Wet Paint that first caught my eye. Nowadays there may be Caution Tape surrounding it to keep people away from the wet paint. The red paint on the utility pole amused me.

Also notable is the GR cast into the door. That means that the post box is from the reign of King George V which dates it from 1910 to 1936. Which means it was at least 50 years old when I took the photo.

Wet Paint on a post box.

Egg laying.

Egg laying again but insects rather then birds this time. A female Banded Demoselle egg laying watched by a male in the background. One from the archives taken in Cheshire, England in the mid 1990s.

In a strange way a follow-up to my Saskatchewan’s Provincial Flower post. You may wonder what the connection is between Damselflies and a Prairie Lily, it’s the lens used. I didn’t use a macro/close up lens for this shot, I used my long telephoto normally used for birds and wildlife. The reason being is that the Damselflies are in the middle of the water inlet of a reservoir a couple of metres from the bank. I set the tripod as low as it would go, mounted the telephoto and then started trying different combinations of teleconverters and extension tubes until I found a mix that gave me the magnification needed.

Banded Demoselles.

A species of Wren.

I do know what species of Wren this is but as it’s Throwback Thursday it gives me an opportunity to illustrate a problem captioning certain photos.

The photo was taken in Cheshire, England in the 1980s. In those days most British field guides gave the common English name as Wren. A few would call it a Winter Wren as it was classified as the same species as the North American Winter Wren.

However, over the past couple of decades scientists have been DNA testing lots of species which has resulted in quite a few being reclassified. What was a Wren or Winter Wren in Britain is now a separate species, the Eurasian Wren. The North American Winter Wren has been split into two species. It’s still the Winter Wren in central and eastern North America but the birds down the west coast are now called the Pacific Wren.

To make matters even more complicated the splitting of the various species means new scientific names for some. As my standard photo caption includes both the common English name and the scientific name it means that quite a high percentage of the birds I have on film now have inaccurate captions written on the slide mounts.

So to the photo. It shows an adult Eurasian Wren emerging from a nestbox. An unusual nest site for the species which normally prefers to build a nest hidden in vegetation.

Jenny Wren is a common English name.

Bodies at rest/bodies in motion.

This week’s Cosmic Photo Challenge is Bodies at rest/Bodies in motion.

My first thought was a flock of birds taking flight. That should be easy as I have lots of flocks of birds in my files. Well it didn’t quite work out as easy as I thought it would be. For example, every photo of Snow Geese taking flight I checked has all the birds in motion. I checked some of the wader (shorebirds) species I have on file. Most of those photos either had all the birds at rest or all the birds in motion.

Then I remembered some of the photos from when I was part of a small group surveying and recording an inland Gull roost on a reservoir in Cheshire. The photo below shows a section of the Black-headed Gulls moving to a different part of the reservoir with other birds staying in place on the water.

Black-headed Gull roost in winter.

Orange on yellow.

A pair of Common Red Soldier Beetles mating on Ragwort flowers. Despite the common English name I’d describe them as orange rather than red.

The Soldier part of the common English name comes from the colour pattern supposedly reminiscent of the red uniforms of early British soldiers.

A film shot from my archives. Taken in Cheshire, England in the mid 1980s.

Soldier Beetles mating on Ragwort flowers.