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Weekly Topics

Common Frog tadpole

My Flora and Fauna Friday post this week is returning to the life cycle of the Common Frog (Rana temporaria).

My last post showed three recently hatched tadpoles on the remains of the frogspawn.

The tadpoles have grown considerably. Their external gills have disappeared and they now resemble a fairly typical tadpole.

Flora and Fauna Friday: Common Frog tadpole
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Weekly Topics

Recently Hatched Tadpoles

This week my Flora and Fauna Friday post is continuing my look at the life cycle of the Common Frog (Rana temporaria).

A few weeks ago I posted a photo of some frogspawn in a garden pond.

The frogspawn is now hatching, these tadpoles are on the remains of the frogspawn. They’re recently hatched and are less than a quarter inch (6 mm) long. They will have to grow considerably before they develop into froglets and leave the water.

Young tadpoles have external gills, visible on the side of the head on the tadpole on the left.

Flora and Fauna Friday: Recently Hatched Tadpoles
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Weekly Topics

Common Frog frogspawn

My Flora and Fauna Friday post this week is continuing the story of the Common Frogs (Rana temporaria) in a garden pond at Hatherton near Nantwich in southern Cheshire, England.

Last week the adult frogs were mating. This is the result, frogspawn in the pond. Each black dot will hatch into a tiny tadpole.

Flora and Fauna Friday: Common Frog frogspawn
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Weekly Topics

Common Frogs mating

My Flora and Fauna Friday post this week is a continuation of last week’s post of a male Common Frog (Rana temporaria) croaking to attract a mate.

This week a pair of Common Frogs are mating in a garden pond at Hatherton near Nantwich in southern Cheshire, England. This is known as amplexus, males develop nuptial pads to help them clasp the female. This allows them to kick away rival males.

Flora and Fauna Friday: 12th March 2021
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Weekly Topics

Common Frog

My Flora and Fauna Friday post this week is the Common Frog (Rana temporaria) found throughout much of Europe as far north as Scandinavia and as far east as the Urals.

Other common English names include the European Common Frog, European Common Brown Frog and European Grass Frog.

This is a male croaking to attract a mate, their throats turn pale/white in the breeding season. Males take up residence in a suitable breeding site and croak to attract females.

This individual was photographed in a garden pond in Hatherton near Nantwich in southern Cheshire, England.

Flora and Fauna Friday: Common Frog
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Lens-Artists

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Summer

This is my contribution to the Lens-Artists Photo Challenge which for the month of July has themes of the seasons, the first is Summer.

As the month has a theme I decided to go with a theme for each of the season posts. I decided to go with one bird, one scenic and one flora or fauna subject for each season and to make the three photos as varied as possible.

 

Tuesday Photo Challenge - Connect

An American White Pelican on a section of the Last Mountain Lake National Wildlife Area in Saskatchewan, Canada. Taken while sitting in the water to keep cool in the summer of 1999.

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: A River Runs Through It

The range light at the mouth of the Saugeen River in Southampton on the Lake Huron shoreline in Ontario, Canada. The 30th photo taken with my then new Olympus E-410 in the summer of 2007.

 

Throwback Thursday: 11th June 2020

Two Common Frogs waiting to catch insects visiting the Thyme flowers in a Hatherton, Cheshire, England garden in the summer of 1988.

 

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Throwback Thursday

Hiding in the Thyme

Throwback Thursday travels back to Cheshire in the late 1980s and some Thyme growing at the edge of a garden pond in Hatherton near Nantwich.

It was a popular spot for some of the resident Common Frogs to sit, waiting for insects to visit the Thyme flowers.

 

Throwback Thursday: 11th June 2020