Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #42 – Creativity.

The new Lens-Artists Photo Challenge is Creativity.

This gave me the opportunity do varying degrees of editing to a selection of shots.

First a photo of an Orange Day-Lily photographed on the South Bruce Peninsula, Ontario, Canada.

Group of Orange Daylily.

After that I did some work on a shot of the Lake Huron shoreline at sunrise with Chantry Island on the horizon. Taken from Dominion Lookout at the bottom of High Street, Southampton, Ontario, Canada.

Lake Huron shoreline at sunrise.

Some moderate editing on a photo of a group of Coneflowers on the South Bruce Peninsula, Ontario, Canada.

Echinacea or Coneflower

Finally, a heavily edited sunrise over Colpoy’s Bay with the Niagara Escarpment on the horizon.

Moody sunrise.

Neon Coneflower.

Orange and pink, which rather strangely was the colours in Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge last week. This is my contribution to Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge which is Color of Your Choice this week.

With grey skies and a lot of snow recently I decided to look through my archives for a bright image from the summer. I found some photos of Coneflowers and decided that they weren’t colourful enough. So I picked one and edited it to increase the brightness and saturation before adding a Polaroid type border.

Florescent Coneflower.

It’s all a blur.

This week’s Cosmic Photo Challenge is It’s A Blur.

One image instantly came to mind when I read the prompt. I then thought of various other photos that would suit the challenge. In the end I went with my initial pick as I seem to have been rejecting my first choice rather a lot recently.

The photo is of the centre of a Coneflower with motion blur. Although there are some hints of sharpness bottom left.

Coneflower detail

 

Coneflower.

A Coneflower, also known as Echinacea. A rather attractive flower that I overlooked in the past.

Taken 5 years ago with a (relatively) modern digital camera and a vintage lens. The lens is a Vivitar 35mm f/1.9 that I picked up used when I was a photography student in the late 1970s. Eventually I replaced it with a much smaller and lighter f/2.8 model.

The Vivitar 35mm didn’t get retired for a few more years. It was the lens I attached to the nest boxes I used to document the nesting cycle of various species in the mid and late 1980s. It was retired after that although I kept it around for a couple of reasons. Firstly as a backup should anything nasty happen to my f/2.8 model. Secondly, having purchased it used and with the rubber grip on the focusing ring having disappeared it wasn’t worth very much.

Five or six years ago I rounded up all my manual focus lenses from the film era to try them on a digital camera. I rather liked the way the ancient Vivitar renders backgrounds (sometimes, other times the backgrounds can be quite ugly) so it found a place in my manual focus prime lens kit. When I’m feeling particularly retro I leave the modern zoom lenses at home and take a small bag containing three or four manual focus prime lenses. Basically going back to the way I shot film as a student.

Echinacea or Coneflower.