Cosmic Photo Challenge: Independent Lenses in Various States.

This is my contribution to the Cosmic Photo Challenge: A State of Independence.

My first thought was a selection of juvenile birds that were independent of the adults when the photos were taken. That idea was quickly followed by the fact that this is the Canada Day long weekend so I considered a Canada Day post.

Then I thought about an ongoing project, testing a variety of lenses on a modern mirrorless camera. Most of the lenses I have tested so far are (or were) made by independent lens makers. Companies that make lenses to fit other makers cameras.

Some of the lenses are in a bit of a state through heavy use or being designed to be almost disposable. Which is why I titled the post “Independent Lenses in Various States” as a rewording of the challenge.

To the lenses.

A Periwinkle flower photographed with a 35mm f/1.7 CCTV lens adapted to fit an Olympus mirrorless camera. Shot with the lens wide open at f/1.7.

This was the first CCTV lens I purchased and I found it interesting enough to purchase a couple more. They’re also known as C-mount lenses having a screw mount for attaching to CCTV cameras with the appropriate mount.

Some of these CCTV lens are very cheap. I wonder if they’re designed to be almost disposable, used where or when a lens could get damaged somehow. The lens was $38 CAD including shipping, the adapter to fit it to the camera and two extension tubes to go between the lens and the camera to allow it to focus on closer subjects.

A Single Blue Flower.

Ivy growing up a tree trunk with a 25mm f/1.4 CCTV lens. This is one of the lenses I ordered after experimenting with the 35mm CCTV lens used for the Periwinkle flower above.

Stopping the lens down from maximum aperture causes severe vignetting so this was shot with the lens wide open at f/1.4. Wide open the lens still vignettes a bit and as the image circle produced by the lens barely covers the sensor there’s some interesting swirling around the edges of the photo.

I have already had to repair the focusing mechanism on the lens after it first jammed and then stopped focussing on distant subjects. That probably explains why the lens cost $36 CAD including shipping and the adapter to fit it to the camera.

Swirling around the edges.

Last years seed pods and new leaves with a 50mm f/1.4 CCTV lens. Shot wide open at f/1.4. This was the other CCTV lens I ordered after experimenting with the 35mm CCTV lens.

Surprisingly good performance for $41 CAD including shipping and the adapter to fit it to the camera. So I’m finding it a bit disappointing so far.

Fresh growth and seed pods.

A Bracken frond taken with a Vivitar 35mm f/1.9 lens I purchased used in the 1970s. Shot wide open at f/1.9. At the time Vivitar were a U.S. brand who designed lenses that were then manufactured by various Japanese lens makers.

The same design was built with a variety of camera mounts allowing the lens to fit a wide range of camera bodies.

I have given this lens a hard life over the years and it now feels like it could fall apart each time I use it.

Bracken frond with an adapted lens from the 1970s.

Dandelion clocks (seed heads) with a “silvernose” Olympus OM Zuiko 50mm f/1.8 lens I purchased in 1976. As with the other shots this was taken with the lens wide open, in this case f/1.8.

I don’t know if it can be classed as an independent lens. It wasn’t designed for the camera being used and requires an adapter but both the lens and camera were made by Olympus.

The silvernose refers to a polished aluminium ring on the front of the lens and signifies that it is one of the early Olympus OM Zuiko lenses. This is another lens that has had a hard life. It has been dropped a few times and was once bounced along the gutter of Charing Cross Road while attached to my Olympus OM1 when it slipped from my shoulder as I ran for the last tube train of the night. A few years later it was being dried out in an oven after being submerged in Georgian Bay.

Dandelion seed heads.

Cosmic Photo Challenge: An Interesting Barn.

An old barn on a local back road on the South Bruce Peninsula, Ontario photographed in a variety of interesting lighting conditions and at different times of the day and year.

This is my contribution to the Cosmic Photo Challenge: Interesting Buildings.

The barn with a rainbow and storm clouds in the autumn.

A different view with a second rainbow behind the barn.

The barn in mist at sunrise in late summer.

Old barn in mist at sunrise.

The barn at sunrise in late spring.

The barn at sunset in early autumn.

The barn in mist at sunrise in mid summer.

Cosmic Photo Challenge: An Anime-Ted Life!

This is my contribution to the Cosmic Photo Challenge: An Anime-Ted Life!

My first thought was animated wildlife, that is wildlife doing something. The first couple of photos I picked for the challenge were bird species from Saskatchewan so I decided to restrict my selection to birds photographed in Saskatchewan.

A male Ruddy Duck displays to a female.

Male Ruddy Duck bubbling at female.

A preening Marbled Godwit.

Preening Marbled Godwit.

A Killdeer having a good stretch.

Stretching Killdeer.

A singing male Red-winged Blackbird.

Male Red-winged Blackbird.

A Black Tern feeding over a roadside marsh.

Feeding Black Tern.

 

Seraphic and Diaphanous.

My contribution to the Cosmic Photo Challenge: Seraphic, Diaphanous, Immutable.

Once I had used online dictionaries to find the meaning of each of the words I had to come up with an idea for the challenge.

This Red-breasted Nuthatch taking flight makes me think of some images of angels (seraphic) and the spread wings are delicate and slightly translucent (diaphanous).

A winter shot with deep snow behind the Cedar tree. The light reflecting off the snow helps to show the translucency of the flight feathers.

Seraphic and Diaphanous.

For the Love Of…..

Bird Photography.

This week’s Cosmic Photo Challenge is For The Love Of..….

After rejecting the first couple of ideas for the challenge I thought about some of the various situations I have been in photographing birds.

A young male Rose-breasted Grosbeak in the rain in Ontario, Canada. The camera and lens was covered to keep the rain off but the photographer wasn’t.

In the rain.

A male Common Kingfisher photographed from a small, cramped and hot canvas hide (blind) in Cheshire, England.

Male Common Kingfisher.

A Bohemian Waxwing photographed at -30°C in Saskatchewan, Canada.

A Bohemian Waxwing at -30°C.

An American White Pelican with a large fish in its pouch. Photographed while sitting in the water to keep cool on a hot and very humid day in Saskatchewan, Canada.

American White Pelican with fish.

A female Common Merganser with a youngster on her back. Taken in Ontario, Canada while being swarmed and bitten by hundreds of mosquitoes.

Hitching a ride.

A male White-breasted Nuthatch photographed in Saskatchewan, Canada. Another -30°C day with some light snow falling this time.

White-breasted Nuthatch

A portrait of a female Wilson’s Phalarope taken while lying in sand mixed with wildfowl poop on the shoreline of a section of Little Quill Lake, Saskatchewan, Canada.

Female Wilson's Phalarope.

Yellow Lady’s Slipper Orchids.

The new Cosmic Photo Challenge is Rebirth and Remembrance.

As it’s spring in Ontario it got me thinking about some of the plant species that will be appearing over the next few weeks. One of the plants in this part of Ontario is the Yellow Lady’s Slipper Orchid. As perennial it is reborn each spring and being an Orchid it is associated with remembrance.

Yellow Lady's Slipper.

Some Spring Arrivals.

The new Cosmic Photo Challenge is The Beauty of Spring.

One thing I always look forward to each spring is the arrival of the various  bird species that head north to breed in the summer.

So here’s a selection of recently arrived summer migrants from the U.K. and Canada.

First, a Sedge Warbler photographed at Hurleston Reservoir, Cheshire, England. One of many warbler species that arrive in the U.K. in the spring.

Summer migrant Sedge Warbler.

Next a male Yellow-headed Blackbird in Saskatchewan, Canada proclaiming his territory having recently arrived for the summer.

A male Yellow-headed Blackbird.

Finally, a male Rose-breasted Grosbeak recently arrived in Ontario, Canada for the summer.

Archaic bird photography of a Rose-breasted Grosbeak.