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2020 Archives

Fan Of… Olympus OM Zuiko 350mm

This is a contribution to Jez Braithwaite’s Fan Of… #55 and a ramble about a lens I have been using for 24 years.

I brought the Olympus OM Zuiko 350mm f/2.8 used in 1996 and over the past 24 years it has been used to photograph a wide variety of subjects. The idea for this post came from exchanging comments with Jez after my recent Fan Of… Olympus Cameras post.

Having owned the lens for so long I have thousands of photos taken with it and I was having a very hard time selecting just five or six for this post. So this will be part one of two, this post will cover bird and wildlife images while the second post will cover everything else.

 

Fan Of... Olympus OM Zuiko 350mm

The 350mm lens on my home made ground pod. The ground pod dates back to the early 1990s.

 

Flying Osprey with flying fish.

An Osprey with a White Sucker on the Lake Huron shoreline in Southampton, Ontario in 2008.

 

Sunlit Squirrel.

An American Red Squirrel in dappled sunlight on the South Bruce Peninsula, Ontario in 2018.

 

Cee's Fun Foto Challenge: Summer Scenes

American White Pelicans on a channel where a marsh drains into a section of the Last Mountain Lake National Wildlife Area, Saskatchewan in 1999. I was sitting in the water with the lens on a tripod in the water with me.

 

A displaying Eurasian Wren

A Eurasian Wren singing in the spring of 1997 at a reservoir in south Cheshire, England.

 

Ruby-throated Hummingbird juvenile.

A juvenile Ruby-throated Hummingbird in flight on the South Bruce Peninsula, Ontario in 2018.

 

Recently emerged from hibernation.

A Richardson’s Ground Squirrel looking for something to eat having just emerged from hibernation in the spring of 1998. Taken close to the town of Punnichy, Saskatchewan, Canada.

 

Categories
One Word Sunday

Volume.

For a small bird they’re surprisingly loud.

A singing Eurasian Wren for One Word Sunday: Volume.

A displaying Eurasian Wren

Categories
Throwback Thursday

A species of Wren.

I do know what species of Wren this is but as it’s Throwback Thursday it gives me an opportunity to illustrate a problem captioning certain photos.

The photo was taken in Cheshire, England in the 1980s. In those days most British field guides gave the common English name as Wren. A few would call it a Winter Wren as it was classified as the same species as the North American Winter Wren.

However, over the past couple of decades scientists have been DNA testing lots of species which has resulted in quite a few being reclassified. What was a Wren or Winter Wren in Britain is now a separate species, the Eurasian Wren. The North American Winter Wren has been split into two species. It’s still the Winter Wren in central and eastern North America but the birds down the west coast are now called the Pacific Wren.

To make matters even more complicated the splitting of the various species means new scientific names for some. As my standard photo caption includes both the common English name and the scientific name it means that quite a high percentage of the birds I have on film now have inaccurate captions written on the slide mounts.

So to the photo. It shows an adult Eurasian Wren emerging from a nestbox. An unusual nest site for the species which normally prefers to build a nest hidden in vegetation.

Jenny Wren is a common English name.