Chicory flower.

A Chicory flower photographed on the side of a road on the South Bruce Peninsula, Ontario.

I like the delicate blues in the flower but I found the greens in the background overpowered the blues. So I desaturated the background until it was close to how I remembered the flower appearing when I took the photo.

Chicory.

Coneflower.

A Coneflower, also known as Echinacea. A rather attractive flower that I overlooked in the past.

Taken 5 years ago with a (relatively) modern digital camera and a vintage lens. The lens is a Vivitar 35mm f/1.9 that I picked up used when I was a photography student in the late 1970s. Eventually I replaced it with a much smaller and lighter f/2.8 model.

The Vivitar 35mm didn’t get retired for a few more years. It was the lens I attached to the nest boxes I used to document the nesting cycle of various species in the mid and late 1980s. It was retired after that although I kept it around for a couple of reasons. Firstly as a backup should anything nasty happen to my f/2.8 model. Secondly, having purchased it used and with the rubber grip on the focusing ring having disappeared it wasn’t worth very much.

Five or six years ago I rounded up all my manual focus lenses from the film era to try them on a digital camera. I rather liked the way the ancient Vivitar renders backgrounds (sometimes, other times the backgrounds can be quite ugly) so it found a place in my manual focus prime lens kit. When I’m feeling particularly retro I leave the modern zoom lenses at home and take a small bag containing three or four manual focus prime lenses. Basically going back to the way I shot film as a student.

Echinacea or Coneflower.

Virginia Spiderwort flower.

A Virginia Spiderwort flower after rain. Wort used in the names of plants and herbs can mean that the species was traditionally used medicinally or as food.

The plant is native to eastern North America. It is commonly grown in gardens and this flower was photographed in Cheshire, England.

Raindrops on a Virginia Spiderwort flower.

Yellow Flag in the rain.

Also known as Yellow Iris and Water Flag.

One from the archives, taken in Cheshire in the mid 1980s. I was playing around with a high speed transparency film, Scotchchrome 1000. I picked it for its pronounced grain and pastel colours, at times adding soft focus or diffusion filters.

I was trying to get an editor or publisher interested in the work. No one was interested at the time although some of the photos have proved popular over the years.

Also known as Yellow Iris and Water Flag.

Saskatchewan’s Provincial Flower.

Having posted a photo of White Trilliums, Ontario’s Provincial Flower I thought a photo of Saskatchewan’s Provincial Flower would make an follow up post of sorts.

The Prairie Lily is found over a quite large section of North America and isn’t limited to prairie habitat. Interestingly, as the Provincial Flower of Saskatchewan it cannot be picked, uprooted or destroyed in any manner in the province.

I found a group of three or four growing in a ditch on a quiet back road. Rather than walk up to the flower with a close up lens I set up my long telephoto on a tripod. That helped isolate the flower from cluttered surroundings and avoided trampling other plants in the ditch.

Saskatchewan's Provincial Flower