Borage Close-Ups.

The Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #34 is Close-Up.

After giving the challenge some thought I decided to concentrate on a single species, in this case the annual herb Borage. Traditionally a garden plant in Britain, it is now being grown commercially to produce Borage seed oil.

A Borage flower bud.

Borage plant.

A Borage flower.

Borage plant.

A stalk of Borage flower buds and a flower.

Borage plant.

Borage seeds.

Borage plant seeds.

Yellow flowers at sunrise.

Saturday morning of week 38 saw me down at Colpoy’s Bay at dawn. There was thick cloud over Colpoy’s Bay and the Niagara Escarpment.

When the rising sun started illuminating the clouds I noticed a small group of Yellow flowers on the shoreline so framed a shot to include them. I used a graduated neutral density filter to balance the exposure for the sky and foreground.

Yellow flowers at sunrise.

Coneflower.

A Coneflower, also known as Echinacea. A rather attractive flower that I overlooked in the past.

Taken 5 years ago with a (relatively) modern digital camera and a vintage lens. The lens is a Vivitar 35mm f/1.9 that I picked up used when I was a photography student in the late 1970s. Eventually I replaced it with a much smaller and lighter f/2.8 model.

The Vivitar 35mm didn’t get retired for a few more years. It was the lens I attached to the nest boxes I used to document the nesting cycle of various species in the mid and late 1980s. It was retired after that although I kept it around for a couple of reasons. Firstly as a backup should anything nasty happen to my f/2.8 model. Secondly, having purchased it used and with the rubber grip on the focusing ring having disappeared it wasn’t worth very much.

Five or six years ago I rounded up all my manual focus lenses from the film era to try them on a digital camera. I rather liked the way the ancient Vivitar renders backgrounds (sometimes, other times the backgrounds can be quite ugly) so it found a place in my manual focus prime lens kit. When I’m feeling particularly retro I leave the modern zoom lenses at home and take a small bag containing three or four manual focus prime lenses. Basically going back to the way I shot film as a student.

Echinacea or Coneflower.