Big and small.

One from the archives taken in Cheshire in the 1980s. It shows two Large White Butterfly caterpillars on Nasturtium leaves.

I can’t explain the difference in size between the two unless they hatched from different groups of eggs. I had seen a female Large White Butterfly egg laying on the Nasturtium¬† plant and photographed the eggs. I later photographed the eggs hatching and the tiny caterpillars exploring the leaf they hatched on. So I’d have thought that those caterpillars would be similar sizes unless they grow at different rates.

Big and small.

Silver-studded Blue Butterflies.

A pair of Silver-studded Blue Butterflies mating on a grass seed head. The species gets its name from the pale blue, reflective spots on the underside of the wings. The spots (or studs) can be seen on the female in this shot which is the lower butterfly.

Photographed on Prees Heath, Shropshire, England in the mid 1990s. The butterflies on Prees Heath are isolated, the nearest other colony being some distance away in North Wales. In fact this population is the only one found in central and northern England. The species is not found in Scotland.

Silver-studded Blue Butterflies mating.

Egg laying.

Egg laying again but insects rather then birds this time. A female Banded Demoselle egg laying watched by a male in the background. One from the archives taken in Cheshire, England in the mid 1990s.

In a strange way a follow-up to my Saskatchewan’s Provincial Flower post. You may wonder what the connection is between Damselflies and a Prairie Lily, it’s the lens used. I didn’t use a macro/close up lens for this shot, I used my long telephoto normally used for birds and wildlife. The reason being is that the Damselflies are in the middle of the water inlet of a reservoir a couple of metres from the bank. I set the tripod as low as it would go, mounted the telephoto and then started trying different combinations of teleconverters and extension tubes until I found a mix that gave me the magnification needed.

Banded Demoselles.

Orange on yellow.

A pair of Common Red Soldier Beetles mating on Ragwort flowers. Despite the common English name I’d describe them as orange rather than red.

The Soldier part of the common English name comes from the colour pattern supposedly reminiscent of the red uniforms of early British soldiers.

A film shot from my archives. Taken in Cheshire, England in the mid 1980s.

Soldier Beetles mating on Ragwort flowers.

Guess what this is?

This week’s Cosmic Photo Challenge prompt is ‘Guess what this is?’

The prompt took me back to the 1980s. In those days BBC Wildlife magazine had a monthly competition for its readers. It was a photo of a mystery species, the first reader to correctly identify the subject won a years subscription to the magazine.

The photo below was used one month, nobody correctly identified the subject.

Anyone interested what the subject is, scroll down under the photo.

Hairy caterpillar

The photo shows clumps of hair on the caterpillar of a Ruby Tiger Moth.