Delicious.

The new Lens-Artists Photo Challenge is Delicious.

My initial idea was for the various caterpillars, spiders and assorted other insects being fed to young birds by their parents.

Then it occurred to me just how many shots of birds and mammals feeding I had in my archives. So I decided to expand on the original idea with a selection of six different feeding behaviours.

First, an American Red Squirrel feeding on seed in the grass in Ontario, Canada.

Feeding American Red Squirrel.

An adult Eurasian Blue Tit feeding young with a green caterpillar in Cheshire, England.

Feeding the young.

A Bohemian Waxwing eating a berry at -30°C in Saskatchewan, Canada.

A Bohemian Waxwing at -30°C.

A Black-throated Blue Warbler pretending it’s an Oriole by feeding on the grape jelly in an Oriole feeder in Ontario, Canada.

Male Black-throated Blue Warbler.

An American White Pelican with a large fish in its pouch in Saskatchewan, Canada.

American White Pelican with fish.

Finally, an adult Great Crested Grebe feeding one of its own breast feathers to its young in Cheshire, England.

Adult Great Crested Grebe with young.

Fossil of a Seashell.

The new Lens-Artists Photo Challenge is Something Different.

I thought this photo of a seashell fossil was different. It’s probably millions of years old but resembles some of the seashells I picked up along the North Wales coast as a child. It was photographed in Ontario, Canada, now hundreds of miles from the nearest salt water.

Seashell fossil.

Weathered and Worn.

The new Lens-Artists Photo Challenge is Weathered or Worn.

First, some boulders placed around the base of Dominion Lookout on the Lake Huron shoreline in Southampton, Ontario. They’re placed there to protect the Lookout from erosion by the water. The various patterns, colours and textures caught my eye.

Boulders on the Lake Huron shoreline.

Now the remains of a fallen tree lying in a ditch on the South Bruce Peninsula. It was the range of colours in this autumn detail that caught my eye.

Worn and Weathered autumn detail.

Finally some weathered and worn wooden pilings sticking out of Colpoy’s Bay at sunrise.

Wooden pilings sticking out of Colpoy's Bay.

Parts of historic Chester.

The new Lens-artists Weekly Photo Challenge is History.

As a photographer who grew up in Cheshire, England my first thought was Roman Chester, or Deva Victrix as the Romans called it when it was one of the main army camps in Roman Britain.

Having mentioned the Romans I will start with a view of the Eastgate Clock. The clock stands on top of the Eastgate, the original eastern entrance to the Roman fortress. For this shot I am standing on the city walls on the south side of the clock.

The Eastgate Clock on Eastgate.

Next a visit to Bridgegate. This gate was constructed in medieval times when the Roman city walls were extended to the south to follow the north bank of the River Dee. The gate then guarded the southern entrance to the town.

Bridgegate, the southern entrance to medieval Chester.

Now a visit to Phoenix Tower. This tower stands at the northeast corner of the city walls. Probably constructed in the 13th century it has also been known as the Newton Tower and King Charles’ Tower in the past. Sections of the city walls on this section are a mixture of Roman and Medieval.

King Charles Tower.

Finally some interesting features inside the city walls. In the foreground is the Chester High Cross which has a long and complicated history dating back centuries but was moved to this position in 1975. Behind the cross are some of the Chester Rows, covered walkways giving access to first floor shops and businesses. The Chester Rows are unique and date back to medieval times.

Chester High Cross and The Rows.

Around Dominion Lookout.

The new Lens-Artists Photo Challenge is Around the Neighborhood.

I was considering the neighborhood I currently live in. I actually had the post started before deciding to change neighborhood, firstly to Saskatchewan, Canada and then to Cheshire, England where I grew up.

I then changed neighborhoods again and moved on to Southampton, Ontario. Located on the shore of Lake Huron, I lived in the town for around eight years and still visit regularly.

I used to spend a lot of my spare time down on the shoreline with a camera so decided to write a post based on the lake shore. I then went with using photos taken within a few hundred yards of Dominion Lookout at the bottom of the High Street as that was one of my regular locations.

I have no idea why it’s called Dominion Lookout, the giant Southampton flagpole is there and I’ve always referred to the area as down by the flagpole.

A female Common Merganser with a line of young in tow. A couple are riding on her back.

Ducks in a row.

Chantry Island and its lighthouse at sunset with a giant sun pillar behind the island. Taken in the winter, Lake Huron is covered with frazil ice. Sun pillars are formed by ice crystals suspended in the atmosphere.

A giant sun pillar.

A Caspian Tern with a small fish flying along the shoreline in the summer.

Caspian Tern with catch.

A view of Chantry Island and its lighthouse from the Lake Huron shoreline early one morning. Taken around 15 years ago this rocky spit is now under water after a rise in the water level.

Sunrise on Lake Huron.

A juvenile Red Knot on the Lake Huron shoreline during autumn migration. One of a couple of Red Knot I spent a few hours with. This shot was taken soon after sunrise in golden light. The birds became comfortable enough to feed, bath, preen and then sleep in front of me.

Red Knot in golden light.

Rocks and waves on the shoreline early one summer morning.

Rocks and waves.

A Red Fox trots along the shoreline. Taken last spring, I later discovered that the Fox is a well known resident with the locals mostly ignoring it

Trotting Red Fox.

A florescent green kayak emerges from the fog on Lake Huron. Taken in the middle of July last year although you wouldn’t think that given the weather.

A splash of green.

Nantwich Square.

The new Lens-Artists Photo Challenge is Architecture.

I thought a quick tour of the centre of my home town would be in order. One of its claims to fame is having one of the highest concentrations of listed buildings in England. The settlement dates back to Roman times when it produced salt for the Roman garrisons at Chester and Stoke-on-trent.

St Mary’s Church stands to the east of the town square. The oldest surviving building in the town, it dates back to the 14th century. One of the few buildings to survive a fire in December 1583 which destroyed most of the town to the east of the River Weaver.

The front of St Mary’s Church.

St Mary's Church front.

The Nantwich War Memorial on the town square with St Mary’s Church in the background.

Nantwich War Memorial.

Part of the square and some of the old buildings around it. St Mary’s Church is on the left side of the photo.

Town Square, Nantwich, Cheshire.

Borage Close-Ups.

The Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #34 is Close-Up.

After giving the challenge some thought I decided to concentrate on a single species, in this case the annual herb Borage. Traditionally a garden plant in Britain, it is now being grown commercially to produce Borage seed oil.

A Borage flower bud.

Borage plant.

A Borage flower.

Borage plant.

A stalk of Borage flower buds and a flower.

Borage plant.

Borage seeds.

Borage plant seeds.