Categories
Weekly Photo Challenge

Creativity in the Time of Covid

This is my contribution to the Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Creativity in the Time of Covid prompt.

I decided to keep it simple and go with a small selection of photos taken during my time in lockdown.

On the Hunt for Joy Challenge: Mix Play with Everyday
Clouds streaking across the sky at dusk. I used the live composite setting on my Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark II. All my sunrise and sunset locations were closed so I set up in a gap in the trees around the yard.
Cosmic Photo Challenge: From an Unusual Angle
Paper Birch trees against a blue sky on the South Bruce Peninsula. I was going for regular walks around the neighborhood. Sometimes the sky seemed deeper blue than normal. Possibly due to the lack of aircraft flying at the time.
Wordless Wednesday: 15th April 2020
Close up of a Pine cone. I set up a table top studio and photographed things that I had picked up on my walks around the neighborhood.
Cee's Black and White Photo Challenge: Close ups or macros
Variegated Hosta leaves in monochrome. I experimented with setting my mirrorless Olympus camera to monochrome.
Categories
2020

Clouds moving across Colpoy’s Bay

I went down to Colpoy’s Bay 45 minutes before sunrise yesterday morning.

This is a 3 minute exposure of the clouds moving across Colpoy’s Bay at dawn. Taken using the Live Composite setting on an Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark II. The base exposure was 1 second with a further 179 exposures of 1 second composited in the camera to record the movement of the clouds.

I suppose a Live Composite image is similar to a Collage which is the Cosmic Photo Challenge prompt this week.

 

Clouds over Colpoy's Bay at dawn

 

Categories
Travel Tuesday

Colpoy’s Bay at night

Travel Tuesday is only traveling back to very early last Saturday morning when I traveled to the dock in the village of Colpoy’s Bay in another attempt to photograph the comet Neowise.

These star trails over Colpoy’s Bay are a 25 minute exposure in total. I was using the live composite setting on an Olympus camera so the initial exposure was 1 second with a further 1,499 1 second exposures added to the initial exposure.

Earth has started passing through the Perseids meteor shower which explains all the shooting stars the camera recorded. The light along the bottom left of the frame is a vehicle driving down the shoreline road. The breaks in the light are when the vehicle is behind trees.

 

Travel Tuesday: Colpoy's Bay at night

 

Categories
Monthly Squares

Perspective on clouds at dusk

This is my day 13 contribution to Becky’s July Squares on the theme of Perspective.

Clouds streaking across the sky at dusk. I had set up the camera hoping for some colourful clouds at sunset but it didn’t happen.

As the camera was set up on the tripod I decided to experiment with the live composite setting on the camera. Using live composite the camera takes a single base exposure and the continues to make exposures recording any highlights that change. A modern take on the old multiple exposures technique.

 

July Squares: Perspective on clouds at dusk

 

Categories
Weekly Photo Challenge

On the Hunt for Joy: Mix Play with Everyday

This is my contribution to Cee’s On the Hunt for Joy Challenge: Mix Play with Everyday and goes back to last Sunday evening.

With my sunrise and sunset locations still closed for health reasons due to Covid-19 I decided to set up in the yard hoping for some colourful clouds at sunset.

The clouds were a bit of a disappointment but as the camera was set up on a tripod I decided to wait for it to get darker so I could play with the live composite setting on the Olympus camera I was using.

Live composite is a modified form of multiple exposure mode which allows you to take a sequence of exposures to build up an image. It combines any moving bright areas from each exposure to create the image. It allows you to photograph, amongst other things, star trails or in my case the clouds moving across the sky.

 

On the Hunt for Joy Challenge: Mix Play with Everyday

Clouds at sunset through a gap in the trees on the South Bruce Peninsula.

 

On the Hunt for Joy Challenge: Mix Play with Everyday

A live composite image. This was a 1 second exposure for the ambient light followed by a further 120 x 1 second exposures recording the highlights (clouds) as they moved.

 

Categories
Lens-Artists Photo Challenge

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Old and New

This is my contribution to the Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Old and New.

I thought it was an interesting prompt and had several ideas for a post. I had my first choice partly planned out in my head and then forgot about the plan and took the wrong lens when I went for a walk with the camera on Sunday morning.

Then on Sunday evening I set up a camera in the yard hoping for some colourful clouds at sunset. There wasn’t much colour at sunset but as I had the camera set up I started using the auto composite setting to record the clouds moving across the sky.

That’s when I started thinking about some of the old techniques for showing movement in a photograph. That led to me thinking about photographic techniques and how some are the same and how some have changed dramatically.

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Old and New

The late 1980s in Cheshire, England. A male Common Blackbird checking on the photographer lying in the grass.

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Old and New

30 years later I’m still lying in the grass and birds are still checking me out. A male Red-breasted Nuthatch on the South Bruce Peninsula, Ontario, Canada.

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Old and New

The early 1980s and I’m on a roof in North London at dusk turning the lights of the city into streaks by zooming the lens during exposure.

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Old and New

Nearly 40 years later and the digital camera I am using has an auto composite setting. This photo was a base exposure of 1 second and a further 120 x 1 second exposures to show the movement of the clouds at dusk.

Edit: On Googling auto composite I discovered that Olympus call it live composite. Probably because you can watch the image building as the exposures continue.