Solitary seed head.

Cee’s Black and White Photo Challenge this week is Isolated Objects.

This seed head came to mind as I have photographed them a few times this winter. I picked this shot because I thought the dark background would isolate the seed head from the background when converted to monochrome.

Monochrome seed head.

Textures in monochrome.

The new Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge is Textures.

Originally it was the subtle texture of the veins of the Ivy leaves that made me think of this shot. Then I wondered if a monochrome conversion would bring out more texture in the bark of the tree trunk.

The monochrome conversion and border was done in Snapseed which I have had on the tablet for some time but am only just getting around to testing.

Monochrome study of Ivy leaves.

A hodgepodge of tree trunks.

Monochrome Monday travels back to last autumn and the vertical version of a shot I used at the time.

It occurred to me some time ago that the shots may make an interesting monochrome conversion. Having used the horizontal version at the time I decided to try converting the vertical one.

It then sat in my pending folder waiting to be used until something made me think of the word hodgepodge and I was encouraged to use it. To me hodgepodge is one of those words  heard quite a lot as a child but that seems to have fallen out of usage these days.

Anyone not familiar with the word a definition of hodgepodge is a confused mixture.

Tree trunk jungle.

Motorcycles in fog.

Throwback Thursday travels back to North Wales in 1981.

It was taken using Ilford XP1, at the time a new type of film announced by Ilford the previous autumn. It was a very early chromogenic film where the silver halide image is replaced by a dye image during processing. This allowed the film to be processed in a regular C-41 colour negative processing line.

The film had either just gone on sale or was soon to be available. I was one of the field testers for it. At the time I was running the photo department of a research institute and was testing the film for use in scientific photography. However I also tested a few rolls for general use.

The Dragon Rally is an annual motorcycle rally held on a mountain in Snowdonia, North Wales in the winter. I was on my way to photograph the event when I stopped to grab this shot of some of the participants emerging from the fog part way up the mountain.

I should add that I intensified the film grain in the photo when editing it as I think it adds to the atmosphere.

Motorcycles emerging from fog.

The South Bank one Sunday morning.

One from the archives taken early one Sunday morning on the South Bank of the River Thames in London, England in the early 1980s.

I was living and working in north London at the time, running a photo department during the week and shooting a variety of personal work at the weekends. Early one Sunday morning I headed down to Westminster with my tripod and camera bag.

There was a light mist over the River Thames which added to my decision to shoot black and white. Big Ben and the Houses of Parliament were partially obscured by the mist, adding to the atmosphere.

I used my Olympus OM1 loaded with Ilford FP4 which was my regular black and white film.

Early morning on the South Bank.

Minimalist wood piles.

A shot from a couple of weeks ago in the middle of December when I had gone down to the Colpoy’s Bay shoreline for the sunrise. The sunrise was so spectacular that I put my telephoto zoom on the camera and started isolating interesting details on the shoreline.

I edited this shot of old wood piles sticking out of the bay at the time but it didn’t work for me. I tried re-editing it a couple of days later but it still didn’t work for me.

Yesterday I re-edited it as a monochrome image and it works for me this way. Now I find myself wondering if subconsciously I had taken the shots as monochrome. It’s strange, when there was still a demand for monochrome images from newspapers and magazines I had no problem “seeing” an image in black and white. But since I stopped shooting black and white I seem to have lost the ability to see monochrome images the way I used to.

Wood piles in monochrome.