Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Change Your Perspective

This is my contribution to the Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Change Your Perspective prompt.

Patti set the challenge by inviting us to “break the habit of shooting photos at eye-level and change your perspective.”

I had a couple of ideas for the challenge. The first was a selection of photos taken at eye level to the subject which can be vastly different to the photographer’s eye-level. The second idea was a selection of photos where the camera is anything but level, pointing up or down.

I had started selecting photos for my second idea before deciding to combine the two.

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Change Your Perspective

Look Up. And don’t be afraid to experiment. Motion blurred tree trunks created by vertically panning the camera during exposure. The extra distortion around the edges of the photo are from using a fisheye lens. Taken last winter on one of my walks around the neighborhood.

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Change Your Perspective

Look Down. In this case into a tree filled valley after overnight snow. Bickerton Hill, Cheshire, England.

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Change Your Perspective

Look Up. And don’t be afraid to experiment again. This photo was made by zooming the lens during exposure. Taken this winter very close to where I took the first Look Up photo the previous winter.

 

 

Sunlit Squirrel.

Eye Level. In this case being at eye level with this American Red Squirrel meant lying in the yard with the lens an inch or two above the grass.

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Change Your Perspective

Eye Level. In this case I got to eye level with the Redwing by photographing it from a bedroom window.

 

Cosmic Photo Challenge: Nature as Art

This is my contribution to the Cosmic Photo Challenge: Nature as Art prompt.

As soon as I read the prompt I had several ideas for the challenge. I decided that any effects in photos I selected had to be done in camera, no heavy editing to get an effect. I also decided that all the photos had to be square, although I can’t really explain that decision.

The centre of a Coneflower. A mix of subject and camera movement coupled with very thin depth of field from the high magnification macro lens.

Cosmic Photo Challenge: Nature as Art

 

Autumn tree trunks. Subject isolation with a telephoto lens turns the tree trunks into a pattern.

October Squares: Lines of Tree Trunks

 

Isolating a small section of a sunrise with a telephoto lens turns it into a graphic image.

Cosmic Photo Challenge: Nature as Art

 

Motion blurred tree trunks. An experiment with moving the camera vertically during exposure.

October Squares: Abstract Lines

 

Shadows of tree trunks across the snow. A straight forward shot with the fallen branch close to following the rule of thirds.

January Squares: Sidelight

 

Cloud movement over Colpoy’s Bay. A 60 second exposure at dawn allows the clouds to move across the sky and makes the water appear calm.

Cosmic Photo Challenge: Nature as Art

 

Cosmic Photo Challenge: Blurred

This is my contribution to the Cosmic Photo Challenge: Blurred.

A selection of blurred images covering over 30 years.

Motion blurred clouds over Colpoy’s Bay due to a sixty second exposure at dawn.

Six Word Saturday, a sixty second exposure at dawn.

 

A blurred Fuchsia flower taken using a soft focus filter and high speed film.

Tuesday Photo Challenge - Fuzzy.

 

Motion blurred motorcycle racing during the night in the Le Mans 24 hour motorcycle race.

Motion at night.

 

Motion blurred tree trunks created by vertically panning the camera during exposure.

Abstract tree trunks.

Cosmic Photo Challenge: What Dreams May Come

This is my contribution to the Cosmic Photo Challenge: What Dreams May Come.

I started thinking about dreams and how reality is distorted in them. That got me thinking about distorting the world around us in photographs.

A recent sunrise over Colpoy’s Bay and the Niagara Escarpment. Taken with a fisheye lens the horizontal field of view is approximately 130 degrees, much wider than the human eye can take in. Yes that is snow and ice on the distorted shoreline in the foreground.

Cosmic Photo Challenge: What Dreams May Come

 

An even more distorted image. Trees in winter distorted by the fisheye lens and by motion blur created by vertically panning the camera during exposure.

Cosmic Photo Challenge: What Dreams May Come

 

Now for an opposite approach, isolating sections of the landscape with a long telephoto. This is a combination of two photos of the same group of trees taken less than 24 hours apart. The trees were first photographed at sunrise while I was scouting for a location for the the full moon rising that evening. The moon rise is over laid on the sunrise.

Cosmic Photo Challenge