A Pair of Mallard

Throwback Thursday travels back to Cheshire, England in the mid 1990s and a pair of Mallard hanging out on the remains of a tree in Hurleston Reservoir near Nantwich.

Another overlooked photo from my slide archives. I find the light rather strange in this photo. The birds and tree stump appear to be front lit while the reflections on the water make me think it’s backlit. I’ve come to the conclusion that the scene is front lit and it’s the angles of the ripples in the water making their reflections appear to be backlit.

Throwback Thursday: 26th March 2020

 

Tuesday Photo Challenge – Scale

When I read the prompt for the Tuesday Photo Challenge – Scale I had several ideas for a post.

Landscapes taken with a telephoto where it’s difficult to get a sense of scale, extreme close-ups where you can’t tell what you’re looking at.

So, typically for me recently, I went in a completely different direction after thinking of a particular photo.

 

Tuesday Photo Challenge - Scale

This is the photo I thought of, a Great Crested Grebe looking lost amongst gulls in a winter roost on Hurleston Reservoir near Nantwich, Cheshire. These are mostly Black-headed Gulls, there’s one Common Gull close to the edge of the frame at about 1 o’clock.

 

Tuesday Photo Challenge - Scale

This may explain why the Great Crested Grebe is looking lost. A section of a winter gull roost on Hurleston Reservoir. Again, mostly Black-headed Gulls with a few Common Gulls, one Lesser Black-backed Gull and one Herring Gull.

 

Tuesday Photo Challenge - Scale

If the second photo didn’t give a sense of scale to the Great Crested Grebe looking lost this one may. This is most of a fairly typical winter gull roost in the 1990s. Anywhere between 12,000 and 15,000 gulls was a normal count. If you look closely there’s a Great Crested Grebe just swimming into the frame on the left hand side of the photo.

 

A Photo a Week Challenge: Over 100 Years Old

This is my contribution to Nancy’s A Photo a Week Challenge: Over 100 Years Old.

When I read the prompt I thought of my home town, Nantwich in southern Cheshire.

St Mary’s Church in the centre of the town dates back to the 14th century. Interestingly, the church consists of two different architectural styles after construction was interrupted for 20 years, possibly because of the Black Death.

 

A Photo a Week Challenge: Over 100 Years Old

The western facade.

 

A Photo a Week Challenge: Over 100 Years Old

A monochrome photo of part of the interior showing some of the woodwork and stonework.

 

On the Hunt for Joy: Cheer Someone Else Up

This is my contribution to Cee’s On the Hunt for Joy Challenge: Cheer Someone Else Up.

I thought of these two photos as soon as I read the prompt. Taken at a Medieval Fair on The Square in the town of Nantwich, Cheshire.

 

On the Hunt for Joy Challenge: Cheer Someone Else Up

A stallholder confirms that the underwear matches the period costume at the Nantwich Medieval Fair.

 

Emptying the postbox.

I knew the postman emptying the post box, he’s trying not to smile as we exchange banter.

 

On the Hunt for Joy: Count Chimneys

This is my contribution to Cee’s On the Hunt for Joy Challenge: Count Chimneys.

Over Christmas I started making digital versions of the slides in my archives. I had previously digitised around 1,500 key slides but there are about 15,000 in my archives. I am currently about halfway through the process.

So a selection of English chimneys photographed in the 1980s from my archives.

An interesting old stone chimney on the corner of Eastgate Street and Bridge Street in the historic centre of Chester, Cheshire.

On the Hunt for Joy: Count Chimneys

 

A soon to be demolished chimney on a former small pox hospital north of London.

On the Hunt for Joy: Count Chimneys

 

Chimneys on some historic buildings on The Square, Nantwich, Cheshire.

On the Hunt for Joy Challenge: Count Chimneys

 

Some chimneys in north London during a severe hailstorm. The “speckled” appearance of the storm clouds is falling hail.

On the Hunt for Joy Challenge: Count Chimneys

 

Cross.

Actually I count at least four crosses. But they’re not really the point of this post.

The tall sundial in the foreground is what remains of a medieval cross. It was turned into a sundial in the late 17th century.

An act of vandalism that wouldn’t be considered these days. Destroying something medieval to make a sundial is the sort of thing that makes me Cross.

This is my contribution to One Word Sunday: Cross.

One Word Sunday: Cross.