Tuesday Photo Challenge – Connect

I had a couple of ideas for the Tuesday Photo Challenge – Connect.

I went with the following idea because there’s two types of connection involved.

The first is a channel connecting a marsh to a section of the Last Mountain Lake National Wildlife Area in Saskatchewan, Canada.

The second is the connection between the birds and the photographer. It was a hot summer afternoon and my options were to lie in the hot sun on the edge of the channel or sit in the water with the birds. After I had been sitting in the water for a while the birds got used to me being there and pretty much ignored me. That’s the sort of connection you want, the birds behaving naturally as if you weren’t there.

 

Tuesday Photo Challenge - Connect

The reason for me sitting in the water, a flock of American White Pelicans fishing in a channel where a marsh drains into a section of the lake.

 

Tuesday Photo Challenge - Connect

I noticed that I was also sharing the channel with a Red-necked Grebe.

 

Tuesday Photo Challenge - Connect

After a while the Pelicans would swim out of the current in the channel and paddle past me back to the start.

 

Tuesday Photo Challenge - Connect

The Grebe also got used to my presence in the water and would surface anywhere around me after a dive.

 

Weekly Prompts: Surface

This is my contribution to the Weekly Prompts: Surface challenge.

I started thinking about some of the water surfaces on the various lake’s and bay’s I have photographed over the years.

I decided to go with a small selection of photos from a section of the Last Mountain Lake National Wildlife Area in Saskatchewan, Canada.

 

Weekly Prompts: Surface

An almost mirror calm surface at sunset in the autumn.

 

Weekly Prompts: Surface

A frozen and partially snow covered surface in the winter.

 

Weekly Prompts: Surface

Some gentle ripples at sunset in the autumn.

 

Frosted Reeds at Dusk

Throwback Thursday travels back to Saskatchewan, Canada in the late 1990s and a frozen section of the Last Mountain Lake National Wildlife Area.

This isn’t the most colourful section of the sky, that is to the south west and this photo is looking north. Whenever I am photographing around dawn and dusk I check behind the camera in case I am missing something interesting. In this case it was the band of colour and the last of the light on the partially frost rimmed reeds along the lake shore.

Throwback Thursday: 23rd January 2020

CFFC: Summer Scenes

This is my contribution to Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Summer Scenes.

The first image that came to mind wasn’t really a “scene” in the sense of a landscape. It was more to do with the memory of a hot summer day and sitting in the water with a large group of American White Pelicans. They were fishing in a channel where a marsh drained into a section of the Last Mountain Lake National Wildlife Area in Saskatchewan, Canada.

Cee's Fun Foto Challenge: Summer Scenes

 

An early summer morning on the Lake Huron shoreline in Southampton, Ontario, Canada.

Friendly Friday: Sunrise.

 

The low sun of a summer evening illuminates the tops of the trees on Bickerton Hill, Cheshire, England.

Low sun on tree tops.

 

The low evening sun casts long shadows and illuminates an old barn on the South Bruce Peninsula, Ontario, Canada.

An old barn 30 minutes before sunset.

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Special Spot Shots

This is my contribution to the Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Special Spot Shots.

I ran through a list of locations in my head and one location quickly made it to the top of the list. Last Mountain Lake, also known as Long Lake is a prairie lake in south central Saskatchewan, Canada. The northern end of the lake is a National Wildlife Area which includes the Last Mountain Lake Bird Sanctuary.

I thought I would put a post together covering a 12 month period.

A section of the National Wildlife Area at sunset in the winter.

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Special Spot Shots

 

A recently arrived male Yellow-headed Blackbird displays to attract a female in the spring.

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Special Spot Shots

 

An American White Pelican in the summer. The keel on the bill means it’s a breeding adult.

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Special Spot Shots

 

A section of the National Wildlife Area at sunset in the autumn.

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Special Spot Shots

 

A flock of Snow Geese taking flight in the autumn. The lake is a stopover location for the species on their way south for the winter.

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Special Spot Shots

 

A section of the National Wildlife Area at sunset in the winter.

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Special Spot Shots

Snow Geese Take Off

Throwback Thursday travels back to Saskatchewan in the late 1990s and Snow Geese on autumn migration.

This is a section of the Last Mountain Lake National Wildlife Area in Saskatchewan. A staging areas for Snow Geese heading south on autumn migration. I was on an observation tower that overlooks part of the Lake photographing small groups of birds flying in to join the main flock on the water. At this point something spooked the main group and the flock took off as one.

Throwback Thursday: Snow Geese Take Off

American White Pelicans.

Throwback Thursday travels back to Saskatchewan in the summer of 1999.

I spent most of the day in the Last Mountain Lake National Wildlife Area. I found a flock of American White Pelicans feeding in a channel where a marsh drains into a section of the lake.

It was a hot day and I wanted to get as close to eye level with the birds as possible. That meant either lying on the bank in the sun or setting up a tripod in the water and sitting behind it in the water.

I had a Uni-Loc tripod with me so it set it up in the water. The Uni-Loc tripods are different from most tripods with the legs in effect reversed. Which means that they can be submerged in water up to the bottom of leg lock. There’s no need to strip the legs down to drain the water and dry the locking mechanisms out unless you go above the leg lock.

The birds were feeding by drifting down the channel letting the water carry them along. These three Pelicans are swimming back up the channel to start again.

Trio of Pelicans.