Snow Bunting

Throwback Thursday travels back to Saskatchewan in the late 1990s and a bitterly cold winter morning. Around -30°C without the wind chill if I recall correctly.

I had found a small flock of Snow Buntings feeding on a field of stubble partially covered in snow. I was photographing the birds from the open window of my pickup truck. It meant that I was sheltered from the wind a little and the birds were ignoring the vehicle when they may not have ignored a human on foot.

The birds were well camouflaged against the snow and stubble. I find the fact that such small birds can survive the winter temperatures in Saskatchewan impressive.

Throwback Thursday: Snow Bunting

Weekly Prompts Photo Challenge: Flamboyant Red

This is my contribution to the Weekly Prompts Photo Challenge: Flamboyant Red.

The prompt got me thinking about some of the various bird species with red in their common English names. Some have very little red plumage.

Then I thought about some of the red birds that don’t have red in their common English names. Such as the Northern Cardinal, you can’t get much more flamboyantly red.

Weekly Prompts Photo Challenge: Flamboyant Red

Cosmic Photo Challenge: Playing with Light

This is my contribution to the Cosmic Photo Challenge: Playing with Light.

The photo was taken in the winter, that’s frazil ice on Lake Huron in the foreground. Which means it also works with the Winter’s Breath challenge.

Mother nature is playing with light supported in a very minor way by me. This is Chantry Island and its lighthouse with a giant sun pillar behind the island. Chantry Island is just off the Lake Huron shoreline in Southampton, Ontario, Canada.

Sun pillars form when the sun is on or below the horizon at sunrise or sunset. The pillar is the reflection of the sun in ice crystals suspended in the air.

My contribution to the playing with light is timing the exposure to coincide with the flashing of the light in the lighthouse. I would count seconds after a flash and release the shutter at five seconds just before the light flashed again.

Cosmic Photo Challenge: Playing with Light

A Photo a Week Challenge: Brown

This is my contribution to the A Photo a Week Challenge: Brown.

This is a male Brown-headed Cowbird feeding on the South Bruce Peninsula, Ontario in the spring.

The common English name for the species comes from the male who has an iridescent black body and a brown head and for the species habit of foraging on the ground following grazing species such as cattle. The grazing animals disturb insects which are caught by the birds.

The species is a brood parasite, the females lay their eggs in the nests of other species. These species can be as wide ranging as Hummingbirds to Raptors.

A Photo a Week Challenge: Brown

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Waiting

This is my contribution to the Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Waiting.

I had a couple of ideas for the challenge before thinking of some of the photos I had taken waiting for various birds and mammals to make an appearance in front of the lens.

The following shots were taken in our yard in 2018 when I was doing my 52 week photo project.

I noticed the way a beam of light was illuminating a patch of Maple leaves.

Backlit Maple branch.

 

I set up in the yard to photograph birds in the rain. When the birds weren’t cooperating I photographed rain drops.

Simplicity.

 

Raindrops on a Cedar branch.

Raindrops on a Cedar tree.

 

Lying in the grass I photographed a Clover flower while waiting for a bird or mammal to appear.

Clover flower in grass

Cosmic Photo Challenge: What Dreams May Come

This is my contribution to the Cosmic Photo Challenge: What Dreams May Come.

I started thinking about dreams and how reality is distorted in them. That got me thinking about distorting the world around us in photographs.

A recent sunrise over Colpoy’s Bay and the Niagara Escarpment. Taken with a fisheye lens the horizontal field of view is approximately 130 degrees, much wider than the human eye can take in. Yes that is snow and ice on the distorted shoreline in the foreground.

Cosmic Photo Challenge: What Dreams May Come

 

An even more distorted image. Trees in winter distorted by the fisheye lens and by motion blur created by vertically panning the camera during exposure.

Cosmic Photo Challenge: What Dreams May Come

 

Now for an opposite approach, isolating sections of the landscape with a long telephoto. This is a combination of two photos of the same group of trees taken less than 24 hours apart. The trees were first photographed at sunrise while I was scouting for a location for the the full moon rising that evening. The moon rise is over laid on the sunrise.

Cosmic Photo Challenge