Waves and rocks.

Waves breaking over rocks on the Lake Huron shoreline at sunrise.

Continuing my recent theme of photos taken with a long telephoto. In this case I used it to isolate the most interesting group of rocks and then used a slow shutter speed to blur the waves a little. A photo from over a decade ago, the water level in Lake Huron is currently quite a bit higher. I suspect most of these rocks are now under water.

Rocks and waves.

A scruffy Red Fox from week 24.

This was my initial choice for week 24 because it was such a strange encounter. I was down at the Lake Huron shoreline in Southampton on Saturday morning. I grabbed the camera I keep in the car just in case there was something interesting.

It was cloudy, the sky was grey as was the water making it hard to tell where one started and the other stopped. Not a lot of bird activity either so I sat on one of the benches around the flagpole at the bottom of High Street. I was fiddling with the strap connectors on the camera when I looked up to see a Red Fox trotting along the Lake Huron shoreline.

It stopped briefly for a drink before carrying on towards me. It trotted past me at which point I stopped taking photos and just watched it. It turned around and started coming towards me again, climbing up on the boulders that protect the flagpole. I then made a huge mistake and stood up to get a better viewpoint. The Red Fox didn’t like that, turned around and disappeared into vegetation to the north of the flagpole.

At that point I forgot about it and started photographing two Ring-billed Gulls that had landed on a boulder. After getting plenty of photos of the Gulls I had gone back to watching for interesting birds when I heard people behind me exclaim about a Fox. It had looped around behind me and was heading back down the beach in the direction it had come from.

Trotting Red Fox.

“Wot you lookin’ at?”

An Eastern Chipmunk checking what the photographer is up to.

I was using my ground pod to get as low to the ground and as close as possible to eye level with the birds, squirrels and chipmunks in the yard. As a result, the Chipmunk would occasionally stand up on its hind legs to get a better view of me. For some reason, in my mind it’s got a belligerent Cockney accent.

Checking out the photographer.

Where the wild things are, in our yard.

This week’s Cosmic Photo Challenge is Where The Wild Things Are.

As someone who photographs wildlife this should be easy for me. Then I remembered a visitor we had in the yard one afternoon. I was sitting on the deck when a Raccoon came wandering into the yard. I grabbed a camera which happened to have a portrait lens on it for a reason I don’t remember. It turned out to be an ideal lens as the Raccoon ignored me as it checked out what the birds had dropped under the feeders.

After shooting a selection of portraits of the animal I started trying different things. In the shot below I focused on the animals front claws rather than the eyes. I can’t decide if it’s annoyed or amused but it looks wild.

A wild Racoon.

Week 21. Ontario’s Provincial Flower.

There’s a good show of White Trilliums on the South Bruce Peninsula this spring. The White Trillium is the provincial flower of Ontario.

The photo was taken on an afternoon walk over the Victoria Day long weekend, know as the May 2-4 weekend. I was going to title the post ‘a group of White Trilliums and a solitary yellow Dandelion’ but decided that was a bit rambling.

Ontario's Provincial Flower.

Twisted into an S.

An Eastern Garter Snake eating a Northern Leopard Frog.

Taken at Big Bay, Ontario. I was photographing a Cedar Waxwing when I heard a noise and discovered the snake slowly swallowing the frog. One of the photos was a runner-up in a photo contest about the preservation of nature which I found a little ironic.

The Daily Post Weekly Photo Challenge is Twisted.

Twisted into an S.