Peaceful.

The new Weekly Prompt Photo Challenge is Peaceful.

Currently living close to a large bay and having lived close to Lake Huron in Ontario and Last Mountain Lake in Saskatchewan I have always found calm water very peaceful.

A calm Colpoy’s Bay with the Niagara Escarpment on the horizon at sunrise. Ontario, Canada.

Colpoy's Bay at sunrise.

Remains of winter ice on Lake Huron at dusk. Ontario, Canada.

Blue ice at dusk.

A calm Last Mountain Lake at sunset. Saskatchewan, Canada.

The sun sets over Last Mountain Lake.

Western Jackdaw.

Throwback Thursday travels back to Cheshire, England in the early 1990s. The reason for picking this Thursday’s subject was my recent contribution to the Tuesday Photo Challenge.

I was photographing garden birds using a shed as a hide (blind). One of the species I photographed was the Western Jackdaw (Coloeus monedula) that nested in the chimneys of local houses. Except that when the photo was taken they were simply called Jackdaw and the scientific name for them was Corvus monedula.

I know that I have written previously about scientific research causing species to be reclassified. In this case both the common English name and the scientific name have been changed.

The photo was later used in a field guide to European garden wildlife.

Western Jackdaw on washing line post.

For the Love Of…..

Bird Photography.

This week’s Cosmic Photo Challenge is For The Love Of..….

After rejecting the first couple of ideas for the challenge I thought about some of the various situations I have been in photographing birds.

A young male Rose-breasted Grosbeak in the rain in Ontario, Canada. The camera and lens was covered to keep the rain off but the photographer wasn’t.

In the rain.

A Common Kingfisher photographed from a small, cramped and hot canvas hide (blind) in Cheshire, England.

Male Common Kingfisher.

A Bohemian Waxwing photographed at -30°C in Saskatchewan, Canada.

A Bohemian Waxwing at -30°C.

An American White Pelican with a large fish in its pouch. Photographed while sitting in the water to keep cool on a hot and very humid day in Saskatchewan, Canada.

American White Pelican with fish.

A female Common Merganser with a youngster on her back. Taken in Ontario, Canada while being swarmed and bitten by hundreds of mosquitoes.

Hitching a ride.

A male White-breasted Nuthatch photographed in Saskatchewan, Canada. Another -30°C day with some light snow falling this time.

White-breasted Nuthatch

A portrait of a female Wilson’s Phalarope taken while lying in sand mixed with wildfowl poop on the shoreline of a section of Little Quill Lake, Saskatchewan, Canada.

Female Wilson's Phalarope.

Male Yellow-bellied Sapsucker.

Throwback Thursday travels back to Saskatchewan, Canada in the late 1990s.

This is a rather smart male Yellow-bellied Sapsucker (Sphyrapicus varius). I say smart because the bird has new, clean plumage for the spring. By the time he has found a mate and excavated a nest hole in a tree he will be rather scruffy.

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker (male).

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge – Less is More.

The new Lens-Artists Photo Challenge is Less is More.

As I had been in a minimalist mood for a while before my accident I thought it was a good excuse to review some of the photos.

First, a group of berries. I’m surprised nothing had eaten them.

A group of red berries.

A Maple leaf on the snow.

Maple leaf on fresh snow.

A seed head in winter.

Monochrome seed head.

Some old wood piles sticking out of Colpoy’s Bay.

Wood piles in monochrome.

Seed pods in winter.

Some seed heads in winter.

Finally, snow on a twig.

Snowy twig.

Firethorn berries.

The new Weekly Prompt Photo Challenge is Sphere.

It got me thinking about spheres in nature, subjects such as flowers, fruit and berries.

These are Firethorn berries also known as Pyracantha. These were photographed in Nantwich, Cheshire, England. It’s a popular plant with some gardeners grown for their decorative flowers and fruit. The fruit (berries) are also popular with some bird species in the winter.

Firethorn berries.