Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Trees.

This is my contribution to the Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Trees.

Hoarfrost covered trees at sunrise, Punnichy, Saskatchewan, Canada.

snow covered prairie and hoarfrost covered trees

Silver Birch trees in snow on Bickerton Hill, Cheshire, England.

Silver Birch trees in the snow.

Quaking Aspens reflected in a slough in the autumn, Punnichy, Saskatchewan, Canada.

Autumn colour and reflection.

Trees in the snow, Hatherton, Cheshire, England.

trees in snow, Hatherton, Cheshire, England.

Abstract trees on the South Bruce Peninsula, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract trees.

Trees and their shadows, Bickerton Hill, Cheshire, England.

Shadows from trees.

A hodgepodge of tree trunks on the South Bruce Peninsula, Ontario, Canada.

Autumn tree trunks.

 

 

Thirteen-lined Ground Squirrel.

Throwback Thursday travels back to Saskatchewan, Canada in the mid 1990s.

This is a Thirteen-lined Ground Squirrel (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) in the summer. Other common English names include the Striped Gopher and Leopard Ground Squirrel,

Sometimes regarded as a pest by farmers and ranchers due to their burrow systems the species is widely distributed across North American prairies and grasslands. It is known for standing upright and checking its territory, probably looking out for predators and rivals.

Ground Squirrel in the summer.

Male Yellow-bellied Sapsucker.

Throwback Thursday travels back to Saskatchewan, Canada in the late 1990s.

This is a rather smart male Yellow-bellied Sapsucker (Sphyrapicus varius). I say smart because the bird has new, clean plumage for the spring. By the time he has found a mate and excavated a nest hole in a tree he will be rather scruffy.

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker (male).

Richardson’s Ground Squirrel.

Throwback Thursday travels back to Saskatchewan one spring in the 1990s.

This is a Richardson’s Ground Squirrel, recently emerged from hibernation and looking for some fresh grass. It could be a male as the males emerge from hibernation in March allowing them to establish territories before the females emerge.

Recently emerged from hibernation.

 

A Yellow Sign of Spring.

A follow-up of sorts to last week’s Throwback Thursday about a Red-winged Blackbird in the spring.

This week’s Throwback Thursday features a male Yellow-headed Blackbird (Xanthocephalus xanthocephalus) recently arrived in Saskatchewan one spring in the 1990s.

This male is in the process of setting up a territory with the intention of attracting a mate. When the females arrive in the spring they will breed and spend the summer before heading back south for the winter.

Yellow Sign of Spring.