Categories
Saturday Bird

Juvenile Red Knot

My Saturday Bird this week is a juvenile Red Knot (Calidris canutus) resting on the Lake Huron shoreline in Southampton, Ontario, Canada.

This individual hatched from an egg in the summer and is now heading south for the winter. It has stopped on the shoreline to feed and rest having already flown from northern Canada. It could travel as far as the southern tip of South America for the winter.

Saturday Bird: Juvenile Red Knot
Categories
Weekly Photo Challenge

Distance

This is my contribution to the One Word Sunday prompt Distance.

On reading the prompt I thought of the distances some bird species cover on migration.

That made me think of the Red Knot, one individual ringed in Argentina breeds in the Canadian arctic. It’s officially known as B95, the identification on the orange ring on its leg. It’s nicknamed Moonbird having flown more than the distance to the moon on its migrations.

This is a juvenile Red Knot on the Lake Huron shoreline on autumn migration. It hatched from an egg in the summer and has already travelled from the Canadian arctic and could travel as far as South America on its first migration.

 

Cee's Fun Foto Challenge: Letter K

 

Categories
Lens-Artists Photo Challenge

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: All Wet

This is my contribution to the Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: All Wet.

My first thought on reading the prompt was birds bathing. I have quite a variety in my archives but I decided that was to easy. So here’s a mix of wet things.

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: All Wet

A young male Rose-breasted Grosbeak in the rain on the South Bruce Peninsula, Ontario.

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: All Wet

A swimming Muskrat near Punnichy, Saskatchewan.

 

Tuesday Photo Challenge - Action

An immature House Sparrow bathing in a bird bath in Hatherton, Cheshire.

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: All Wet

Dew on grass photographed from a portable canvas hide (blind) while photographing European Rabbits at Brown Moss, Shropshire.

 

Cee's Fun Foto Challenge: Letter K

An immature Red Knot bathing on the Lake Huron shoreline in Southampton, Ontario.

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: All Wet

Dew on a Rose leaf in a Hatherton, Cheshire garden.

 

Categories
Cee's Fun Foto Challenge

CFFC: Sense of Touching

This is my contribution to Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Sense of Touching.

The first thing that came to mind when I read the prompt was of some wader (shorebird) species that use their bills to find food in water, sand or mud.

 

Cosmic Photo Challenge: Through an Opening

American Avocets feeding on a slough near Punnichy, Saskatchewan. The sense of touch in use here is when the birds sweep their slightly open bills through the water feeling for anything edible.

 

Cee's Fun Foto Challenge: Letter K

An immature Red Knot feeding on the Lake Huron shoreline in Southampton, Ontario on its autumn migration. The bird is using the sense of touch in its bill to probe for food in the sand under the rocks on the shoreline.

 

Feeding Marbled Godwit.

A Marbled Godwit feeding in a marsh between Little Quill Lake and Middle Quill Lake, Saskatchewan. The bird is using the sense of touch in its bill to probe the mud for worms and anything else edible.

 

Categories
Lens-Artists Photo Challenge

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Morning

This is my contribution to the Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Morning.

I am a morning person and often have the alarm set to allow me to get to a location half an hour before sunrise. So here’s a small selection of photos taken around sunrise but not necessarily what I would call a photo of a sunrise.

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Morning

Waves and rocks on the Lake Huron shoreline soon after sunrise.

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Morning

A female Eurasian Blue Tit egg laying early in the morning.

 

One Word Sunday: Knot

A juvenile Red Knot on the Lake Huron shoreline at sunrise.

 

Friendly Friday: Art Unexpected

Waves and ripples on Lake Huron at sunrise.

 

Tuesday Photo Challenge - Trees

Snow and hoarfrost covered farmland at sunrise.

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Treasure Hunt

A Eurasian Blue Tit silhouetted against the rising sun.

 

Categories
Weekly Prompts

Weekly Prompts: Boundaries

The Weekly Prompts: Boundaries challenge got me thinking about the variable boundaries wild birds and animals put between themselves and humans.

The reason I say variable is because most species will keep their distance from humans. The more erratic and noisy the behaviour of the human the wider the boundary between them.

On the other hand, some understanding of animal behaviour and some fieldcraft will allow you to get within a few feet of many species. I have had wild birds and mammals approach me so closely that I couldn’t focus the lens I was using on them.

 

Weekly Prompts: Boundaries

Portrait of a female Wilson’s Phalarope taken at Middle Quill Lake, Saskatchewan, Canada. A flock of six Wilson’s Phalaropes landed close to me when I was photographing some American White Pelicans. I laid down in the sand and wildfowl poop at the edge of the lake and proceeded to spend some time with them. When I was lying down the birds started ignoring me. This female was so close I couldn’t get all her body in the frame. Some of the birds wandered so close I couldn’t focus on them.

 

Friendly Friday: Funny Furry Friends

This European Rabbit was photographed in Shropshire, England. I was surprised how relaxed some Rabbits were at this location. I know there was a Red Fox hunting them. I did wonder if they were so  relaxed because they knew that the Fox wouldn’t be around if there was a human in the area.

 

Cee's Fun Foto Challenge: Letter K

A juvenile Red Knot resting on the Lake Huron shoreline in Southampton during its autumn migration. I had gone down to the shoreline for the sunrise and discovered two Red Knot. I spent long enough with them that they started ignoring me allowing me to photograph them feeding, bathing, preening and resting.

 

Friendly Friday Photo Challenge: Christmas Preparations

This Eastern Chipmunk was photographed in our yard in Ontario, Canada. The various birds and mammals got so used to me lying in the grass that summer that they started ignoring me. I had Chipmunks running across my legs while squirrels and birds landed in the Cedar branches a few feet away checking out the human in the grass.

 

Categories
Tuesday Photo Challenge

Tuesday Photo Challenge – Travel

This is my contribution to the Tuesday Photo Challenge – Travel.

As it’s spring and we are seeing a few summer migrants on their way north for the summer my idea for this challenge was bird migration. I have a few species in my files that make very impressive migrations.

So I thought a small selection of birds that are part way through their long distance migrations.

 

Friendly Friday Photo Challenge: Odd Couples

This is an adult White-crowned Sparrow with an immature White-crowned Sparrow in the background. These birds are on autumn migration and were photographed in my yard. The immature bird would have hatched from an egg in northern Canada in the summer. Some White-crowned Sparrows breed as far north as the edge of the tree line in Arctic Canada and some will winter as far south as central Mexico.

 

Tuesday Photo Challenge - Travel

This is a female Northern Wheatear on autumn migration. Photographed on the bank of Hurleston Reservoir near Nantwich in southern Cheshire, England. This bird will have spent the summer in either Greenland or Arctic Canada. It has crossed the Atlantic Ocean either by flying directly to Britain or by travelling via Iceland. After resting and feeding on the reservoir bank for a while it will continue its migration to spend the winter in Sub-Saharan Africa.

 

One Word Sunday: Knot

This is a juvenile Red Knot on autumn migration. Photographed on the Lake Huron shoreline in Southampton, Ontario at sunrise. This bird will have hatched from an egg in the Canadian Arctic in the summer. After feeding and resting it will continue to head south to spend the winter on the southern tip of South America. That’s 15,000 kilometers or 9,000 miles. One bird, banded (ringed) in South America in 1995 was recorded in the Canadian Arctic in 2014 by which time its total flight distance exceeded the distance to the moon. There’s more information on B95, nicknamed Moonbird here.