Cross.

Actually I count at least four crosses. But they’re not really the point of this post.

The tall sundial in the foreground is what remains of a medieval cross. It was turned into a sundial in the late 17th century.

An act of vandalism that wouldn’t be considered these days. Destroying something medieval to make a sundial is the sort of thing that makes me Cross.

This is my contribution to One Word Sunday: Cross.

One Word Sunday: Cross.

St Mary’s Church, Acton, Cheshire

The new Tuesday Photo Challenge is Worship.

This is St Mary’s Church, Acton, Cheshire. Built in the 12th century the tower collapsed in a storm in March 1757 and was rebuilt after the storm but shortened by over 20 feet.

Built with local red sandstone I like the colour combination of the deep blue sky, weathered red sandstone and green grass.

St Mary's Church south side.

Structural red sandstone.

This week’s Cosmic Photo Challenge is Sublimely Structural. It was rather well timed as I had been planning on using this photo in a post.

This is St Mary’s Church, Acton, Cheshire, England built of, presumably local, red sandstone. I say presumably local because there’s a red sandstone ridge sticking out of the Cheshire plain a few miles to the west of Acton. Parts of the Church are medieval although there are Norman era carved stones in the south aisle. The tower was built around 1180 but its top collapsed in a storm in March 1757 and was rebuilt 20 feet lower than the original tower.

The tall monument in the foreground is now a sundial but was originally a medieval cross before being converted into a sundial in the late 17th century.

Red sandstone Church in Acton,