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Saturday Bird

Redwing

My Saturday Bird this week is the Redwing (Turdus iliacus), a member of the thrush family. It’s not related to the Red-winged Blackbird native to North America.

The Redwing is native to Europe and the Palearctic and is a winter visitor to the U.K. although a few birds stay to breed in the summer. This individual is eating a Holly berry in a garden in Hatherton, Cheshire, England.

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Change Your Perspective
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Monthly Squares

Eye Level with a Redwing

This is my day 28 contribution to Becky’s July Squares on the theme of Perspective and another of my eye level perspective photos.

This one is a little different than a lot of my eye level perspective series for July Squares. Rather than lying down, sometimes in something nasty, I am standing in a bedroom taking photographs out of the bedroom window.

This is a Redwing, a member of the Thrush family and a native of Europe and the Palearctic feeding on a Holly berry in a Hatherton, Cheshire garden in the winter.

 

July Squares: Eye Level with a Redwing

 

Categories
Lens-Artists Photo Challenge

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Change Your Perspective

This is my contribution to the Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Change Your Perspective prompt.

Patti set the challenge by inviting us to “break the habit of shooting photos at eye-level and change your perspective.”

I had a couple of ideas for the challenge. The first was a selection of photos taken at eye level to the subject which can be vastly different to the photographer’s eye-level. The second idea was a selection of photos where the camera is anything but level, pointing up or down.

I had started selecting photos for my second idea before deciding to combine the two.

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Change Your Perspective

Look Up. And don’t be afraid to experiment. Motion blurred tree trunks created by vertically panning the camera during exposure. The extra distortion around the edges of the photo are from using a fisheye lens. Taken last winter on one of my walks around the neighborhood.

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Change Your Perspective

Look Down. In this case into a tree filled valley after overnight snow. Bickerton Hill, Cheshire, England.

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Change Your Perspective

Look Up. And don’t be afraid to experiment again. This photo was made by zooming the lens during exposure. Taken this winter very close to where I took the first Look Up photo the previous winter.

 

 

Sunlit Squirrel.

Eye Level. In this case being at eye level with this American Red Squirrel meant lying in the yard with the lens an inch or two above the grass.

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Change Your Perspective

Eye Level. In this case I got to eye level with the Redwing by photographing it from a bedroom window.

 

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Lens-Artists Photo Challenge

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: A Window With A View

This is my contribution to the Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: A Window With A View.

It was the photo of a Woodpecker looking out of its nest hole in Amy’s prompt for the challenge that gave me the idea for this post. It made me think of the various species of birds I have photographed looking out of their nest holes. Then I started considering the reverse, me looking out of openings when I was photographing various species.

A house window. Actually a bedroom window of my parents house in Cheshire, England. An upstairs window got me closer to eye with this Redwing eating a Holly berry.

A Redwing in a Holly tree.

 

A vehicle window. Friend’s had this Red Fox hunting in the hay field behind their house. I parked by the side of their garage and photographed it out of the drivers door window.

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: A Window With A View

 

An opening in a permanent wooden hide (blind). In this case, two Great Crested Grebes on a reservoir in south Cheshire, England.

A pair of Great Crested Grebes.

 

An opening in a fabric portable hide (blind). A male Common Redpoll feeding on seeds blown onto a snow drift near Punnichy, Saskatchewan, Canada.

Throwback Thursday: 9th January 2020

Categories
Throwback Thursday

Another Winter Visitor

Throwback Thursday travels back to Cheshire, England in the 1980s and is a follow-up to last week’s post.

This is a Redwing, the second Thrush species that arrives in the U.K. from northern Europe to spend the winter. This individual has taken up residence in a Holly tree where it was feeding on the berries.

Throwback Thursday: Redwing

Categories
Weekly Photo Challenge

CFFC: Gardens

This is my contribution to Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Gardens.

A selection of nature subjects taken in a variety of gardens over the years.

 

A Redwing eating a Holly berry photographed in a Cheshire, England garden in the mid 1980s.

A Redwing in a Holly tree.

 

Orange Daylily photographed in an Ontario, Canada garden a couple of years ago.

Weekly Prompts Photo Challenge: Bloom.

 

An Eastern Chipmunk photographed in a garden in Ontario, Canada a decade or so ago.

An Eastern Chipmunk posing for a photo.

 

Borage flower buds photographed in Cheshire, England garden in the mid 1990s.

Borage plant.

 

A leucistic juvenile Great Spotted Woodpecker photographed in a Cheshire, England garden in the late 1980s.

Leucistic Woodpecker on a suet feeder.

 

A Coneflower photographed in an Ontario, Canada garden a year or two ago.

Echinacea or Coneflower.

 

Categories
Throwback Thursday

Redwing eating a Holly berry.

Throwback Thursday travels back to Cheshire, England in the mid 1980s.

The Redwing (Turdus iliacus) is a member of the Thrush family. They are winter visitors to Britain arriving in the autumn after breeding in northern regions of Europe and Asia. Wintering birds sometimes form loose flocks numbering up to 200 birds but I seem to remember this being a solitary bird. It’s feeding on a berry of a Holly (Ilex aquifolium) tree.

The photo was taken from a bedroom window so I was slightly higher than the bird but not enough for the angle to look odd. It was used in a field guide to garden wildlife and it was taken in a garden unlike some of my other photos used in the book.

A Redwing in a Holly tree.