Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Chaos

This is my contribution to the Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Chaos.

I had a couple of ideas for the challenge before thinking of some of the large flocks of birds I have photographed.

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Chaos

Gulls, mostly Black-headed Gulls, in seemingly random flight over Hurleston Reservoir near Nantwich in southern Cheshire. In this case I suspect that one of the local Peregrine Falcons has spooked them into flight as there’shardly two birds flying in the same direction.

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Chaos

Snow Geese on autumn migration take off from a section of the Last Mountain Lake National Wildlife Area in Saskatchewan. I was watching the birds from an observation tower when something, possibly a Coyote on the lake shore, spooked them into flight.

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Chaos

Gulls, mostly Black-headed Gulls, on the move at Hurleston Reservoir near Nantwich in southern Cheshire. In this case something has spooked some of the birds on one side of the roost and they’re flying to the other side.

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Chaos

Lines of Snow Geese flying to roost at sunset in the autumn. These birds are over Middle Quill Lake, Saskatchewan.

 

Tuesday Photo Challenge – Scale

When I read the prompt for the Tuesday Photo Challenge – Scale I had several ideas for a post.

Landscapes taken with a telephoto where it’s difficult to get a sense of scale, extreme close-ups where you can’t tell what you’re looking at.

So, typically for me recently, I went in a completely different direction after thinking of a particular photo.

 

Tuesday Photo Challenge - Scale

This is the photo I thought of, a Great Crested Grebe looking lost amongst gulls in a winter roost on Hurleston Reservoir near Nantwich, Cheshire. These are mostly Black-headed Gulls, there’s one Common Gull close to the edge of the frame at about 1 o’clock.

 

Tuesday Photo Challenge - Scale

This may explain why the Great Crested Grebe is looking lost. A section of a winter gull roost on Hurleston Reservoir. Again, mostly Black-headed Gulls with a few Common Gulls, one Lesser Black-backed Gull and one Herring Gull.

 

Tuesday Photo Challenge - Scale

If the second photo didn’t give a sense of scale to the Great Crested Grebe looking lost this one may. This is most of a fairly typical winter gull roost in the 1990s. Anywhere between 12,000 and 15,000 gulls was a normal count. If you look closely there’s a Great Crested Grebe just swimming into the frame on the left hand side of the photo.

 

January Squares: Lines of Flight

This is my day 16 contribution to Becky’s January Squares: Light photo challenge and day four of my five day sequence of Flight squares.

These are lines of Snow Geese flying to roost at sunset in the autumn. Taken a Little Quill Lake, Saskatchewan, Canada, a staging area for the species on their way south for the winter.

January Squares: Lines of Flight

Wings over water

The new Weekly Prompts Photo Challenge is Wings.

I thought about swarms of insects but decided that while you can see the insects you can’t see their wings while they’re flying in the swarm.

Then I thought about some of the photos from when I was a member of a small group of birders surveying and recording a winter roost of Gull species on an inland reservoir in south Cheshire, England.

A photo of Black-headed Gulls in winter roosting on Hurleston Reservoir at night. If something disturbs the birds on an edge of the roost they will fly to another side of the roost which is what they’re doing in the photo.

Black-headed Gull winter roost.

Bodies at rest/bodies in motion.

This week’s Cosmic Photo Challenge is Bodies at rest/Bodies in motion.

My first thought was a flock of birds taking flight. That should be easy as I have lots of flocks of birds in my files. Well it didn’t quite work out as easy as I thought it would be. For example, every photo of Snow Geese taking flight I checked has all the birds in motion. I checked some of the wader (shorebirds) species I have on file. Most of those photos either had all the birds at rest or all the birds in motion.

Then I remembered some of the photos from when I was part of a small group surveying and recording an inland Gull roost on Hurleston Reservoir in south Cheshire. The photo below shows a section of the Black-headed Gulls moving to a different part of the reservoir with other birds staying in place on the water.

Black-headed Gull roost in winter.

A few Black-headed Gulls

The Weekly Photo Challenge is Prolific.

For several years in the 1990s I was part of a small group surveying and recording an inland Gull roost on a reservoir in Cheshire, England. Numbers peaked in the winter although there was birds there every month.

The majority of the birds were Black-headed Gulls. Typical numbers were between 13,000 and 22,000 Black-headed Gulls in the winter.

The photo shows part of the roost in the process of moving to a different section of the reservoir.

Black-headed Gulls on the move.