On the tip of the Bruce Peninsula.

A longer and very different post from what my regular readers are used to. I want to talk about my experiences at the Tobermory Hyperbaric Facility and The Meeting Place in Tobermory, Ontario.

As I may have hinted at in some earlier posts from 2019 I have had an ongoing health issue that started late in 2018. I had a sore on my right calf that I couldn’t get to heal and that became infected. As a result, between Christmas and the new year I found myself in the local emergency room being put on intravenous antibiotics.

Six weeks later a succession of doctors and a surgeon had managed to almost double the size of the sore and it was also deeper into the leg. I was beginning to wonder if it would ever heal and was getting very frustrated with the medical treatment I was receiving.

One of the nurses dressing what was by now a wound realised how frustrated I was and arranged for me to see Dr. George Harpur who runs the hyperbaric chamber in Tobermory on the northern tip of the Bruce Peninsula. Dr. Harpur took over my treatment and after a few visits I was ready to go into the hyperbaric chamber.

After 22 sessions (11 days) in the hyperbaric chamber the wound had shrunk from over an inch in diameter to the size of a small pea. I’m still surprised at the speed the wound healed.

Having two sessions in the hyperbaric chamber each day I went over to The Meeting Place¬†between sessions. There’s a lounge area, various rooms and a kitchen where you can use the microwave to warm something up for your lunch. It’s open to anyone and has Wi-Fi, some of my blog activity over the past couple of weeks has been from there.

A very useful facility with a nice atmosphere. With a wide variety of activities held there I would describe it as a hub for the local community. It’s a popular place and a great concept, other communities in the area could take note.

To the photo and its connection to this post. I first visited Tobermory in the summer of 1985. I took a glass bottomed boat tour out to Flowerpot Island and took this photo from the back of the boat as it was leaving Tobermory.

Canadian flag on a tour boat.

Fence post and a splash of Gold.

The new Cee’s Black and White Photo Challenge is Fences and gates.

I had forgotten about this selective colour treatment until finding it with some shots of Swallows on barbed wire fences. I have also forgotten why I did a monochrome conversion with the selective colour.

The old license plate holding the fence post together gives a big clue about where the photo was taken. A male American Goldfinch peeking around a fence post at the photographer. Taken one summer in Saskatchewan .

Fence and a splash of Gold.

Neon Coneflower.

Orange and pink, which rather strangely was the colours in Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge last week. This is my contribution to Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge which is Color of Your Choice this week.

With grey skies and a lot of snow recently I decided to look through my archives for a bright image from the summer. I found some photos of Coneflowers and decided that they weren’t colourful enough. So I picked one and edited it to increase the brightness and saturation before adding a Polaroid type border.

Florescent Coneflower.

Eye of frog.

I know that the title sounds like part of a recipe being prepared in a cauldron to put a spell on someone but the latest Wits End Weekly Photo Challenge is Eyes so the title was to hard to resist.

A Common Frog (Rana temporaria) hiding in the pondweed in a garden pond in Cheshire, England.

Eye of the frog.

Sunbathing Dunnock.

The new Wits End Weekly Photo Challenge is Comfortable and Cozy.

I had my post almost finished before changing my mind about which photo I was going to use and starting again. The only part of the first version to survive is the opening sentence with the link to the Weekly Photo Challenge.

Thinking about the challenge a second time got me thinking about summer, warmer weather and the sun, probably because we had been under snow squall warnings and extreme cold warnings for a lot of last week. That made me think of this photo of a sunbathing Dunnock (Prunella modularis) in Cheshire, England.

The bird is obviously comfortable and cozy in the warm sun.

Sunbathing Dunnock.

If you’re wondering what my initial pick for this challenge was it was this photo.

 

Male Northern Cardinal.

The new Weekly Prompt is Red.

My initial ideas were bird species with red in the common English name until I realised that I had already used quite a few of those in a variety of previous posts. So wanting something different I thought about mammals and insects with red in the name only to realise that I had used some of them in earlier posts.

I then thought about photo of red subjects that didn’t have red in the name. In that case one of the more obvious North American species is the Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis).

The common English name derives from Roman Catholic Cardinals who wear red robes. It should be noted that the males are red, females being mostly grayish-brown with a slight reddish tint on the wings, crest and the tail feathers.

Northern Cardinal male feeding.