Falling Water.

My contribution to the Wits End Weekly Photo Challenge Falling Water.

I was considering some of the birds and mammals I have photographed in the rain before deciding to go with a couple of shots of a nearby waterfall. Despite now living close to the waterfall these shots were taken in 1985 when I spent part of the summer in Ontario.

A wide view of Inglis Falls on the Sydenham River near Owen Sound, Ontario, Canada.

Falling Water.

Selecting a section of the falls with a telephoto lens.

Falling Water.

Spot the Great Blue Heron.

The new Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge is Signs.

I had a few ideas for the challenge before thinking of some photos of a Great Blue Heron fishing behind a no fishing sign.

In some shots I focused on the bird, others I focused on the sign. For this challenge I picked a shot where the sign was in focus and the Heron appears to be laughing at the sign.

No Fishing Sign.

Mmm, suet cake.

The new Tuesday Photo Challenge is Cake.

This was a difficult one for me until I remembered that some people call the various shapes of suet blocks used in bird feeders suet cake. Possibly because often the suet has fruit, berries, seeds and/or nuts mixed into it.

Here’s a male White-breasted Nuthatch feeding on suet cake while hanging upside down.

White-breasted Nuthatch on feeder.

Looks Like a Face?

The new Cee’s Black and White Photo Challenge is Looks Like a Face.

My first thought was some insects that have markings that resemble eyes and are thought to have evolved to startle or frighten potential predators.

The most obvious species for me is the European Peacock, more commonly known simply as the Peacock Butterfly, which gets its common English name from the eyespots on the tip of each wing.

To me, the eyespots on the hindwings make it look like a rabbit peeking out from behind the forewings.

Eyespots on a Peacock Butterfly.

The wonder of migration.

The new Tuesday Photo Challenge is Wonder.

Each spring I wait for the return of the Ruby-throated Hummingbirds. Having spent the winter in the tropics they head north for the summer. The only Hummingbird species that breeds to the east of the Mississippi River some Ruby-throated Hummingbirds travel north of the Great Lakes to breed. A tremendous journey for such a small bird.

This male was photographed on the South Bruce Peninsula, Ontario last summer and obviously doesn’t like its photo being taken as it’s sticking its tongue out at the photographer.

Flying male Ruby-throated Hummingbird.

 

On the tip of the Bruce Peninsula.

A longer and very different post from what my regular readers are used to. I want to talk about my experiences at the Tobermory Hyperbaric Facility and The Meeting Place in Tobermory, Ontario.

As I may have hinted at in some earlier posts from 2019 I have had an ongoing health issue that started late in 2018. I had a sore on my right calf that I couldn’t get to heal and that became infected. As a result, between Christmas and the new year I found myself in the local emergency room being put on intravenous antibiotics.

Six weeks later a succession of doctors and a surgeon had managed to almost double the size of the sore and it was also deeper into the leg. I was beginning to wonder if it would ever heal and was getting very frustrated with the medical treatment I was receiving.

One of the nurses dressing what was by now a wound realised how frustrated I was and arranged for me to see Dr. George Harpur who runs the hyperbaric chamber in Tobermory on the northern tip of the Bruce Peninsula. Dr. Harpur took over my treatment and after a few visits I was ready to go into the hyperbaric chamber.

After 22 sessions (11 days) in the hyperbaric chamber the wound had shrunk from over an inch in diameter to the size of a small pea. I’m still surprised at the speed the wound healed.

Having two sessions in the hyperbaric chamber each day I went over to The Meeting Place between sessions. There’s a lounge area, various rooms and a kitchen where you can use the microwave to warm something up for your lunch. It’s open to anyone and has Wi-Fi, some of my blog activity over the past couple of weeks has been from there.

A very useful facility with a nice atmosphere. With a wide variety of activities held there I would describe it as a hub for the local community. It’s a popular place and a great concept, other communities in the area could take note.

To the photo and its connection to this post. I first visited Tobermory in the summer of 1985. I took a glass bottomed boat tour out to Flowerpot Island and took this photo from the back of the boat as it was leaving Tobermory.

Canadian flag on a tour boat.

Fence post and a splash of Gold.

The new Cee’s Black and White Photo Challenge is Fences and gates.

I had forgotten about this selective colour treatment until finding it with some shots of Swallows on barbed wire fences. I have also forgotten why I did a monochrome conversion with the selective colour.

The old license plate holding the fence post together gives a big clue about where the photo was taken. A male American Goldfinch peeking around a fence post at the photographer. Taken one summer in Saskatchewan .

Fence and a splash of Gold.