Juvenile Chipping Sparrow.

Taken a week ago, this is a juvenile Chipping Sparrow in the yard. It must have been a very late brood, the adults had been feeding three young a few days before this photo was taken.

This juvenile is already looking after itself as it searches for something to eat in the grass. They will soon be heading south for the winter.

Chipping Sparrow juvenile.

 

An impression of trees, part two.

Continuing my experiments of deliberate camera movement during exposure. For this shot I framed a group of thin tree trunks and panned the camera up in the direction of the trunks as I released the shutter.

The settings for this shot were an exposure time of 1/3 of a second with an aperture of f/5.6 at 100 ISO.

Abstract tree trunks.

Old wood piles at sunrise.

Saturday morning of week 35 saw me down at Colpoy’s Bay for the sunrise. Another sunrise with no interesting cloud meant that once the sun was above the horizon I was looking for ripples and reflections.

The photo shows a row of old wood piles in Colpoy’s Bay. The sun is above the Niagara Escarpment in line with the right edge of the piles.

Piles and ripples at sunrise.

Thick cloud at dawn.

Monochrome Monday is going back a day. I went down to Colpoy’s Bay for the sunrise yesterday but there was thick cloud covering the area.

I was in a retro mood and had packed my smallest camera bag with with four manual focus prime lenses. As I was shooting the way I did in the 1970s and early 1980s I decided to shoot as if I was using black and white film with the intention of converting the digital files to monochrome.

Originally I was considering this as the pick for week 52. It’s a 50 second exposure taken about 25 minutes before sunrise using a 4 stop neutral density filter. The long exposure means that the water is mostly smoothed out and there’s some movement in the clouds.

The lens used for this shot was a Vivitar 35mm f/1.9 I picked up as a photography student in the late 1970s. The lens was used when I got it so it’s over 40 years old. I’m beginning to question why the Vivitar is in my retro set. If I’m using it on a tripod it’s invariably stopped down so the fast aperture is irrelevant. Also, the focusing is now so worn I get worried about the lens falling apart when I mount a filter holder and start sliding filters into the holder.

Thick cloud at sunrise.

Week 35. Watching the sky.

Sunday afternoon of week 35 saw me lying in the yard trying for shots of one of the three Eastern Gray Squirrels that appeared in the area recently. Still no luck with shots of the Squirrels but I had some cooperative birds prepared to pose for me.

I picked this shot because despite the Red-breasted Nuthatch being on the ground looking for seeds it’s looking up at the sky, more interested in something overhead than finding seeds.

Watching the sky.

Big and small.

One from the archives taken in Cheshire in the 1980s. It shows two Large White Butterfly caterpillars on Nasturtium leaves.

I can’t explain the difference in size between the two unless they hatched from different groups of eggs. I had seen a female Large White Butterfly egg laying on the Nasturtium¬† plant and photographed the eggs. I later photographed the eggs hatching and the tiny caterpillars exploring the leaf they hatched on. So I’d have thought that those caterpillars would be similar sizes unless they grow at different rates.

Big and small.