Fan Of… Uni-Loc tripods

This is a contribution to Jez Braithwaite’s Fan Of… #58 photo challenge.

Firstly I should say that I don’t know if Uni-Loc are still in business. I emailed them a couple of years ago and after an initial response never heard from them again.  Their Facebook page hasn’t been updated since 2012. I have been using the tripods since the early 1990s and used to know Ken Brett, the man behind the design.

Uni-Loc tripods are very different from most tripods. The system tripods can be disassembled and reassembled in a different configuration with an Allen key (wrench). The legs can be locked at almost any angle and all three lock with a single locking lever. The bottom leg sections are sealed meaning that they can be submerged up to the locking knob without taking on water. If you submerge the legs above the first section they can quickly be removed and drained with an Allen key (wrench).

They aren’t a tripod I would recommend to most photographers, they’re heavy and bulky when folded but in deep water, snow or mud they’re my first choice.

 

Fan Of... Uni-Loc tripods

In 1995 I spent the summer in Saskatchewan, Canada. I took my medium sized Uni-Loc tripod with me in case I needed to use a tripod in water or mud.

 

Fan Of... Uni-Loc tripods

A Willet photographed on a shallow slough near Punnichy, Saskatchewan with the tripod. Some of the sloughs in the area can be quite alkaline so the sealed legs were useful. I could rinse any mud off the legs when I got a chance to.

 

Wordless Wednesday: 5th February 2020

To get into position for this photo I waded through knee high snow and then pushed the tripod legs down into the snow for maximum stability.

 

Fan Of... Uni-Loc tripods

The tripod in use on the Colpoy’s Bay shoreline at sunrise. I was photographing the waves forming icicles. By the time I was ready to pack the tripod away two of the legs were frozen to the pebbles.

 

Wordless Wednesday: 18th December 2019

What I was photographing while the tripod was freezing to the pebbles.

 

Patterns and Texture in the Ice

Throwback Thursday travels back to Saskatchewan in the late 1990s and a frozen section of marsh at sunset.

The strange circular patterns and the texture on the surface of the ice caught my eye. What almost looks like film grain is the texture of the ice surface.

 

Throwback Thursday: 5th March 2020

A frozen section of marsh at Little Quill Lake, Saskatchewan at sunset.

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Treasure Hunt

Tina has challenged everyone to a Treasure Hunt for this week’s Lens-Artists Photo Challenge.

It all got a little confusing for me due to various issues unconnected with this blog. In the end I copied and pasted the list of treasure hunt items to a memo as a reminder.

Just to make things even more complicated I also made myself some rules. A set of four photos with two horizontal compositions and two vertical compositions. Also as wide a variety of techniques and subject matter as possible.

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Treasure Hunt

A frozen marsh at sunset, Little Quill Lake, Saskatchewan. This covers the sunset and the cold items of the treasure hunt. I’m assuming -40 degrees is cold enough.

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Treasure Hunt

A yellow bicycle in the snow. This covers bicycle and cold on the list of treasure hunt items. Actually, it’s the shadow of a tree on the shed that makes the shot for me.

 

Weekly Prompts: Home Crafts

Sewing a camera strap. This is for sewing in the list of bonus items.

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Treasure Hunt

A Blue Tit silhouetted against the rising sun. This covers the sunrise and bird items of the treasure hunt.

 

Little Quill Lake at sunset, WWE #16

This is my contribution to Jez Braithwaite’s Water Water Everywhere Photo Challenge #16 although in this case the surface water is frozen. You would probably have to cut through a couple of feet of ice to get to liquid water.

 

Water Water Everywhere Photo Challenge #16

A frozen section of marsh at Little Quill Lake, Saskatchewan, Canada. A few months earlier the area had been a staging area for thousands of Snow Geese on autumn migration.

 

Fan Of… OM Zuiko 350mm lens, part 2

This is a contribution to Jez Braithwaite’s Fan Of… #56 photo challenge and part two of my ramble about the Olympus OM Zuiko 350mm lens I have been using since 1996. If you missed part one it’s here.

Part 2 is about some of the unexpected photos taken with the lens.

 

Fan Of... OM Zuiko 350mm lens part 2

The 350mm lens set up in the snow on the South Bruce Peninsula in 2009.

 

Fan Of... Olympus OM Zuiko 350mm lens

A rain drop in the rain. Taken while waiting for some birds to visit the yard in 2018.

 

Tuesday Photo Challenge - Trees

Hoarfrost covered trees on snow covered farmland at sunrise near Punnichy, Saskatchewan in 1998. I was scouting a location to photograph a moonrise.

 

Fan Of... OM Zuiko 350mm lens

While waiting for the moon to rise over the snow covered farmland in the above photo I photographed a group of White-tailed Deer across a small valley at dusk.

 

Fan Of... OM Zuiko 350mm lens, part 2

A Prairie Lily, the provincial flower of Saskatchewan photographed near Punnichy, Saskatchewan in 1998.

 

A giant sun pillar.

A sun pillar behind Chantry Island, Lake Huron, Ontario in 2005. The biggest and brightest sun pillar I have ever seen made even bigger by using the 350mm.

 

Banded Demoselles.

A female Banded Demoselle egg laying while being watched by a male. Photographed in southern Cheshire in 1997. The insects were in the middle of a water inlet to a reservoir several metres from solid ground. So I used a long forgotten mix of extension tubes and teleconverters behind the lens to get the magnification and close focusing I needed.