Long lasting technology.

The new Cosmic Photo Challenge is Technology.

The photo is of a lift bridge in the village of Wrenbury, Cheshire, England.

The lift bridge was designed by Thomas Telford, built in 1790 and is still in use today. It spans the Llangollen branch of the Shropshire Union Canal and carries traffic over the canal. When a boat comes along the bridge is lifted to allow the boat through.

Wrenbury Mill behind the bridge is now used by a company who rent canal narrow boats for holidays. Part of the hire fleet is visible on the right of the photo.

Wrenbury lift bridge over the Llangollen branch of the Shropshire Union Canal.

 

Parts of historic Chester.

The new Lens-artists Weekly Photo Challenge is History.

As a photographer who grew up in Cheshire, England my first thought was Roman Chester, or Deva Victrix as the Romans called it when it was one of the main army camps in Roman Britain.

Having mentioned the Romans I will start with a view of the Eastgate Clock. The clock stands on top of the Eastgate, the original eastern entrance to the Roman fortress. For this shot I am standing on the city walls on the south side of the clock.

The Eastgate Clock on Eastgate.

Next a visit to Bridgegate. This gate was constructed in medieval times when the Roman city walls were extended to the south to follow the north bank of the River Dee. The gate then guarded the southern entrance to the town.

Bridgegate, the southern entrance to medieval Chester.

Now a visit to Phoenix Tower. This tower stands at the northeast corner of the city walls. Probably constructed in the 13th century it has also been known as the Newton Tower and King Charles’ Tower in the past. Sections of the city walls on this section are a mixture of Roman and Medieval.

King Charles Tower.

Finally some interesting features inside the city walls. In the foreground is the Chester High Cross which has a long and complicated history dating back centuries but was moved to this position in 1975. Behind the cross are some of the Chester Rows, covered walkways giving access to first floor shops and businesses. The Chester Rows are unique and date back to medieval times.

Chester High Cross and The Rows.

On the tip of the Bruce Peninsula.

A longer and very different post from what my regular readers are used to. I want to talk about my experiences at the Tobermory Hyperbaric Facility and The Meeting Place in Tobermory, Ontario.

As I may have hinted at in some earlier posts from 2019 I have had an ongoing health issue that started late in 2018. I had a sore on my right calf that I couldn’t get to heal and that became infected. As a result, between Christmas and the new year I found myself in the local emergency room being put on intravenous antibiotics.

Six weeks later a succession of doctors and a surgeon had managed to almost double the size of the sore and it was also deeper into the leg. I was beginning to wonder if it would ever heal and was getting very frustrated with the medical treatment I was receiving.

One of the nurses dressing what was by now a wound realised how frustrated I was and arranged for me to see Dr. George Harpur who runs the hyperbaric chamber in Tobermory on the northern tip of the Bruce Peninsula. Dr. Harpur took over my treatment and after a few visits I was ready to go into the hyperbaric chamber.

After 22 sessions (11 days) in the hyperbaric chamber the wound had shrunk from over an inch in diameter to the size of a small pea. I’m still surprised at the speed the wound healed.

Having two sessions in the hyperbaric chamber each day I went over to The Meeting Place¬†between sessions. There’s a lounge area, various rooms and a kitchen where you can use the microwave to warm something up for your lunch. It’s open to anyone and has Wi-Fi, some of my blog activity over the past couple of weeks has been from there.

A very useful facility with a nice atmosphere. With a wide variety of activities held there I would describe it as a hub for the local community. It’s a popular place and a great concept, other communities in the area could take note.

To the photo and its connection to this post. I first visited Tobermory in the summer of 1985. I took a glass bottomed boat tour out to Flowerpot Island and took this photo from the back of the boat as it was leaving Tobermory.

Canadian flag on a tour boat.

Structural red sandstone.

This week’s Cosmic Photo Challenge is Sublimely Structural. It was rather well timed as I had been planning on using this photo in a post.

This is St Mary’s Church, Acton, Cheshire, England built of, presumably local, red sandstone. I say presumably local because there’s a red sandstone ridge sticking out of the Cheshire plain a few miles to the west of Acton. Parts of the Church are medieval although there are Norman era carved stones in the south aisle. The tower was built around 1180 but its top collapsed in a storm in March 1757 and was rebuilt 20 feet lower than the original tower.

The tall monument in the foreground is now a sundial but was originally a medieval cross before being converted into a sundial in the late 17th century.

Red sandstone Church in Acton,

Orange and Pink.

The latest Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge is Orange and Pink.

Having spent some time trying to think of a bird species with orange and pink plumage I decided to go with the more obvious idea of a sunrise or sunset.

In the end I went with a colourful dawn over Colpoy’s Bay, Ontario, Canada with a conveniently parked sailboat.

Sailboat at dawn.

Motorcycles in fog.

Throwback Thursday travels back to North Wales in 1981.

It was taken using Ilford XP1, at the time a new type of film announced by Ilford the previous autumn. It was a very early chromogenic film where the silver halide image is replaced by a dye image during processing. This allowed the film to be processed in a regular C-41 colour negative processing line.

The film had either just gone on sale or was soon to be available. I was one of the field testers for it. At the time I was running the photo department of a research institute and was testing the film for use in scientific photography. However I also tested a few rolls for general use.

The Dragon Rally is an annual motorcycle rally held on a mountain in Snowdonia, North Wales in the winter. I was on my way to photograph the event when I stopped to grab this shot of some of the participants emerging from the fog part way up the mountain.

I should add that I intensified the film grain in the photo when editing it as I think it adds to the atmosphere.

Motorcycles emerging from fog.