Shadow across the tracks.

A shot from a walk earlier in the week and originally taken for my response to the Lens-Artists Weekly Photo Challenge Shadows.

In the end I didn’t use it for the challenge but put a film type border around it using Snapseed.

It’s strange, in my film era I was never a fan of these types of borders but nowadays I think they can give an image a certain character.

Tracks in the snow with a shadow.

Mistle Thrush eating a windfall apple.

Throwback Thursday continues a recent theme of birds eating windfall apples in the winter.

This is a Mistle Thrush (Turdus viscivorus) eating a windfall apple in an orchard. The Mistle Thrush gets its name from its liking of Mistletoe berries. Apparently Mistle is an old English name for the plant.

This individual was photographed in Cheshire, England in the late 1980s. In the U.K. they are a year round resident.

A Mistle Thrush in an orchard.

Shadows and snow.

My contribution for the Lens-Artists Photo Challenge Shadows.

This is now the third version of a post for this challenge. I decided to go with a snow theme after the second version had snow in over half the shots. Then I went for a walk on Monday afternoon and got another photo for the challenge.

Tree trunk and shadows.

Shadows on the snow with a tree trunk.

Shadows across the tracks.

Tracks in the snow with shadows.

Lying in the shadows.

Lying in the shade on the snow.

A barcode on the snow.

shadows on snow

Structural red sandstone.

This week’s Cosmic Photo Challenge is Sublimely Structural. It was rather well timed as I had been planning on using this photo in a post.

This is St Mary’s Church, Acton, Cheshire, England built of, presumably local, red sandstone. I say presumably local because there’s a red sandstone ridge sticking out of the Cheshire plain a few miles to the west of Acton. Parts of the Church are medieval although there are Norman era carved stones in the south aisle. The tower was built around 1180 but its top collapsed in a storm in March 1757 and was rebuilt 20 feet lower than the original tower.

The tall monument in the foreground is now a sundial but was originally a medieval cross before being converted into a sundial in the late 17th century.

Red sandstone Church in Acton,