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Wintering Fieldfare.

A follow-up of sorts to a recent Throwback Thursday post of a Redwing eating a Holly berry.

The Fieldfare (Turdus pilaris) is another member of the Thrush family and related to the Redwing. As with the Redwing they arrive in Britain in the autumn to spend the winter having bred in northern Europe and Asia.

Taken in Cheshire, England in the 1980s. This bird had taken up residence in an orchard, feeding on windfall apples in the snow.

Wintering Fieldfare in an orchard.

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Throwback Thursday

Red-breasted Nuthatch.

Throwback Thursday only travels back about nine years. A follow up of sorts to my Wordless Wednesday post yesterday as the shots were taken a couple of weeks and maybe a distance of five yards apart.

There’s a reason why I picked a Red-breasted Nuthatch (Sitta canadensis) for this Throwback Thursday post. The species had been a regular and common visitor to the yard and feeders since I moved to the area 10 years ago.

Until this autumn that is. After having a yard full of adults and young early in the autumn I’m now hardly seeing any. I hadn’t really noticed the dramatic reduction in numbers until I read something online about large numbers of Red-breasted Nuthatches moving into the north eastern U.S. from Canada. It’s thought that the conifer seed crop in Canada is low causing the birds to head south for the winter. Since reading about the irruption a week or so ago I have seen only two birds in the yard, a few days apart.

This article gives more information and probably explains why our Purple Finches have also disappeared.

As the cap on top of the birds head is black this is a male Red-breasted Nuthatch. Females have a slate grey cap, the colour of the back and wings.

Male Red-breasted Nuthatch.

 

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Wordless Wednesday

Black-capped Chickadee.

Black-capped Chickadee in the winter.

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Throwback Thursday

Redwing eating a Holly berry.

Throwback Thursday travels back to Cheshire, England in the mid 1980s.

The Redwing (Turdus iliacus) is a member of the Thrush family. They are winter visitors to Britain arriving in the autumn after breeding in northern regions of Europe and Asia. Wintering birds sometimes form loose flocks numbering up to 200 birds but I seem to remember this being a solitary bird. It’s feeding on a berry of a Holly (Ilex aquifolium) tree.

The photo was taken from a bedroom window so I was slightly higher than the bird but not enough for the angle to look odd. It was used in a field guide to garden wildlife and it was taken in a garden unlike some of my other photos used in the book.

A Redwing in a Holly tree.

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Wordless Wednesday

Common Redpoll feeding.

Feeding Common Redpoll.

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Archives

Being spied on from the edge of a field.

One from the archives, taken in Saskatchewan, Canada in the late 1990s.

In the winter I would regularly check fence lines and field boundaries for wintering bird species. On one occasion I spotted this Coyote (Canis latrans) watching me from the edge of a field.

A Coyote watches the photographer.

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Throwback Thursday

Whooper Swan at sunset.

Throwback Thursday travels back to Martin Mere Wetland Centre, Lancashire, England in the early 1990s.

I had planned on being at this location for sunset after working out roughly where the sun would set earlier in the day. I had been in the same hide (blind) earlier in the day when the sun was behind it taking shots of the various species feeding. I may have even photographed this particular bird.

A Whooper Swan (Cygnus cygnus) at sunset.

Sunset Whooper Swan.