Bohemian Waxwing at -30°C.

Throwback Thursday is a follow-up of sorts to yesterdays Wordless Wednesday post. Here’s a Bohemian Waxwing (Bombycilla garrulus) at -30°C.

Both birds were photographed in Saskatchewan, Canada in the winter. I’m always impressed by the way small birds survive winter temperatures.

Nowadays some digital cameras make a big deal about a freezeproof rating of -10°C. I find that rather humourous having shot film at -40°C and digital at -20°C.

I found a small flock of Bohemian Waxwings feeding along a fence line one morning. I briefly considered putting up a portable hide (blind) until I thought about how hard it would be to peg down given how frozen the field would be. In the end I followed them along the fence line for a while before leaving them to finish stripping the berries.

A Bohemian Waxwing at -30°C.

 

Feeding Whooper Swan.

One from the archives taken in Lancashire, England in the mid 1990s.

I was at the Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust Martin Mere reserve. There was a few Whooper Swans (Cygnus cygnus) close to one of the hides in the morning. With the nice light on the birds I spent some time shooting as wide a variety of images as possible.

I like the way the light is catching the drops of water on the birds head and neck as it feeds.

Portrait of a feeding Whooper Swan.

 

Bodies at rest/bodies in motion.

This week’s Cosmic Photo Challenge is Bodies at rest/Bodies in motion.

My first thought was a flock of birds taking flight. That should be easy as I have lots of flocks of birds in my files. Well it didn’t quite work out as easy as I thought it would be. For example, every photo of Snow Geese taking flight I checked has all the birds in motion. I checked some of the wader (shorebirds) species I have on file. Most of those photos either had all the birds at rest or all the birds in motion.

Then I remembered some of the photos from when I was part of a small group surveying and recording an inland Gull roost on Hurleston Reservoir in south Cheshire. The photo below shows a section of the Black-headed Gulls moving to a different part of the reservoir with other birds staying in place on the water.

Black-headed Gull roost in winter.

An unlikely evening.

The Daily Post Weekly Photo Challenge is Unlikely.

One winter evening I went down to the Lake Huron shoreline for the sunset. The lake was covered with frazil ice and there was some nice layered clouds over Chantry Island. I positioned the tripod on the shoreline so that the sun would set to the right of the Lighthouse on Chantry Island.

Shortly after the sun had dropped below the horizon it illuminated the clouds nicely.

Chantry Island at sunset.

I learned long ago not to put the camera away until the last light has gone from the sky and this evening justified the rule. Shortly after the above photo was taken the largest and most spectacular sun pillar I had ever seen appeared behind the island. It made me think of a special effect in a science fiction movie.

A giant sun pillar.

A few Black-headed Gulls.

The Weekly Photo Challenge is Prolific.

For several years in the 1990s I was part of a small group surveying and recording an inland Gull roost on a reservoir in Cheshire, England. Numbers peaked in the winter although there was birds there every month.

The majority of the birds were Black-headed Gulls. Typical numbers were between 13,000 and 22,000 Black-headed Gulls in the winter.

The photo shows part of the roost in the process of moving to a different section of the reservoir.

Black-headed Gulls on the move.