Week 52. Minimalist seed head.

This seed head was photographed on a walk mid week. I had taken shots of some of these seed heads a week or so previously but those shots hadn’t really worked for me.

I photographed another of these seed heads in low sun on Saturday afternoon but prefer the simplicity of this earlier shot.

This brings to an end my 52 week photo project. Due to various issues I wasn’t planning a project for 2019. Until yesterday that is when I came up with the minimalistic monochrome or monochrome minimalism I rambled on about in the previous post.

Simply a seed head.

Hoarfrost on Cotoneaster.

One from the archives taken in Cheshire, England in the mid 1990s. I think this is Cotoneaster horizontalis, commonly grown in gardens and popular with some species of birds in the winter due to the berries. It is native to western China but is well established in the U.K. where some consider it my be becoming invasive.

I have two copies of the original slide. The first, done several years ago has a much warmer colour than this version edited last winter. I normally prefer a warmer colour balance to a shot but for this post went with the cooler colour balance.

Hoarfrost on Cotoneaster berries.

Black-capped Chickadee taking flight.

Throwback Thursday travels back nine years and about 7 metres (approximately 23 feet) from where I am sitting typing this post. Taken during the first winter after we moved here in the autumn.

It’s also a follow-up of sorts to last week’s Throwback Thursday as both photos were taken the same day. They were taken when I was testing a 1.4x teleconverter, used to increase the magnification of a lens by 40%.

It shows a Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus) taking flight. Unlike last week’s Red-breasted Nuthatch we’ve still got lots around the feeders and yard this winter.

A Black-capped Chickadee taking off.

Wintering Fieldfare.

A follow-up of sorts to a recent Throwback Thursday post of a Redwing eating a Holly berry.

The Fieldfare (Turdus pilaris) is another member of the Thrush family and related to the Redwing. As with the Redwing they arrive in Britain in the autumn to spend the winter having bred in northern Europe and Asia.

Taken in Cheshire, England in the 1980s. This bird had taken up residence in an orchard, feeding on windfall apples in the snow.

Wintering Fieldfare in an orchard.