Waves at Sunrise.

The new Wits End Weekly Photo Challenge is Found Art.

I was considering a few photos and then thought about some of my shots of waves and ripples at sunrise and sunset. I find the randomness of the waves and ripples and the way the colours in the sky reflect on the water interesting.

This shot was taken on the Lake Huron shoreline in Southampton, Ontario, Canada at sunrise.

Sunrise waves.

Fireworks in the Round.

This week’s Wits End Weekly Photo Challenge is Round Things.

As usual I had a few ideas for the challenge before thinking of something completely unrelated to my original thoughts. I had the post finished before deleting it and reverting to one of my original ideas.

A variety of round fireworks at the Wiarton Village Fair taken from the dock in the village of Colpoy’s Bay. The dock is a couple of miles away from the fireworks across the bay.

Wiarton Village Fair fireworks.

 

Snow Geese gathering.

The new Wits End Weekly Photo Challenge is Gatherings.

I thought of a few potential photos of wildlife gatherings  for the challenge.

I decided to go with a shot of a flock of Snow Geese taking flight at Last Mountain Lake National Wildlife Area, Saskatchewan, Canada. One of the prairie locations used as a stop over on their way south for the winter.

A gathering of Snow Geese.

Nuthatch Family.

The new Wits End Weekly Photo Challenge is Feathered Friends.

As a long time bird photographer I had all sorts of ideas for a post. Then I started thinking about bird families and realised that I could post about the Nuthatch family divided by decades and locations.

So we’ll start in Cheshire, England with a European species, the Eurasian Nuthatch (Sitta europaea), also known as the Wood Nuthatch. Photographed in the 1980s, I had set up a shovel handle as a perch for a European Robin that wouldn’t cooperate. So I photographed the Nuthatch when it used the perch.

Wood Nuthatch.

Now to a North American species, the White-breasted Nuthatch (Sitta carolinensis) photographed in Saskatchewan, Canada in the 1990s. A bitterly cold winters day, around -30°C with some light snow coming down. The dark crown stripe means that this is probably a male.

White-breasted Nuthatch

Finally, another North American species, a Red-breasted Nuthatch (Sitta canadensis) photographed in Ontario, Canada in the 2000s. Once again, the dark crown stripe means that the bird is probably a male.

Male Red-breasted Nuthatch.

Odd One Out.

The new Wits End Weekly Photo Challenge is Something that Doesn’t Belong.

I was considering going with an obvious pick, an solitary bird in a flock of a different species for example.

Then I thought about some of the early autumn colour I had photographed last year. I edited one of the shots to make the colour difference more extreme.

Now, in theory, an autumn leaf belongs. They all change colour and fall eventually, but it’s not something you want to see to early in the autumn.

An early autumn leaf.

 

Colourful Dusk.

The new Wits End Weekly Photo Challenge is Bright Colors.

A fairly easy challenge you would have thought. I came up with a long list of possible subjects in my head. I then thought about some of the colourful skies I have photographed over the years and changed direction for this post.

This colourful dusk is one that I may never forget. Not just because of the colour but also because it was -40° and a few minutes previously there had been Snow Buntings flying past me to roost in a reed bed. It should be noted that -40° is roughly the same in Celsius and Fahrenheit.

I added a glow with Snapseed to give a dreamlike quality and then a border as I’ve been on a bit of a border kick recently. The view is of a section of frozen marsh at Little Quill Lake, Saskatchewan, Canada approximately 20 minutes after the sun dropped below the horizon.

Frozen marsh at dusk.

Motion at night.

The new Wits End Weekly Photo Challenge is Motion.

This is the third version of my response to the challenge after deciding that the first two photos I picked were a bit to obvious.

This is a shot of one of the competitors in the Le Mans 24 hour motorcycle race. The rider is exiting the last turn onto the start/finish straight. Taken around midnight, so 9 hours into the race with 15 to go.

Motion at night.